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GSBN:Copyright Humanity



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<HTML><BODY BGCOLOR=#FFFFFF>When I was following a workshop on making Compressed Earth Blocks in India I received a  
training manual. And on the first page it said:
 

<FONT COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FACE="Times New Roman">
<CENTER></FONT>
<FONT COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FACE="Symbol">ã</FONT>
<FONT COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FACE="Times New Roman"> Humanity as a whole
 
No rights reserved!
 

 
All parts of this publication may be reproduced, 
 
by any means, without the written permission of the author.
 
Feel free to disseminate anywhere this information.
 

 
</CENTER><I></FONT>
<FONT COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FACE="Times New Roman">That got me thinking...
 
</I>
 
And then there is Linux, the Operating System that is giving headaches to the richest man on  
the planet, Bill Gates. A stable OS that is created by many and free of charge! 
 

 
<I>Hmmmm....</I>
 

 
A wonderful book like 'The Straw Bale House' is a valuable piece of work. But for an Indian  
architect to buy a book in this price-range, printed in the US, it would represent about one  
3</FONT>
<FONT COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FACE="Times New Roman">rd</FONT>
<FONT COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FACE="Times New Roman"> of his/her monthly salary. 
 

 
You get the point; in order to share our knowledge, on SB and other sustainable living  
methods, far and wide we need a medium that is easily available, and therefor cheap and  
easy to disseminate.  (Don't get me wrong, I too love workshops, but they are not the only  
medium)
 

 
Internet, like in the form of this mailing list and various websites is becoming such a medium.  
But although the web is arriving at some surprisingly remote places, it has certain limits.
 
-It needs a (telephone) connection.
 
-Difficult if not impossible (Flash) to copy.
 
-Online-time is money.
 
-Because downloading big files takes time photo's and graphical info are more or less  
avoided on the web.  Which is a shame since drawings/pictures and video can often transmit  
information more clearly and circumvent the language barrier as well.
 
-Web pages can be changed, moved or even worse gone, next time you want to check  
something.
 
-The web is BIG, "where was it again that I saw that article?"
 

 
<I>And then there are CD-roms
 
</I>-Can easily and cheaply be copied.
 
-No time constraint.
 
-Enough disk space for lots of photos, drawings and video.
 
-The Disk is owned, so no worries of webmasters taking away the content you appreciate.
 
-A CD is limited (maybe to a certain topic) and I'm confident we can find search engines to  
scan the disk (even inside the text documents).
 
For instance to find info on living roofs. I search inside the documents for these words.
 

 
<I>Well, I could go on for a long time since this idea has been brewing in my head for a  
while now. I've discussed it with quite a few and the main questions they ask are:
 
</I>
 
<I>How are you going to market (make a living out of) this CD?
 
</I>The point is, I'm <B>not!
 
</B>Like Linux software anybody would be allowed to copy and sell the CD thus making some  
money, but I feel it is key that <B>nobody </B>would be able to stake a claim on this project. 
 
Read the GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE (pasted under this message) under which  
Linux is distributed if you want to know more about this in detail.
 

 
<I>How will you obtain material to publish?
 
</I>Besides sharing our own info, I believe people will share parts of their expertise with a  
project like this.
 

 
<I>Why would someone share their work like this?
 
</I>-Those really passioned about their work usually like to share it in many ways. Just like Linux  
was, and still is, build by many who believe this is a valuable way to work together.
 
-Those with a more 'marketing type of mind' could see it as free publicity. A way to show  
their expertise in a certain field.
 

 
<I>Would the author keep his/her copyright?
 
</I>The author would always be allowed to use his/her work any way the author sees fit.
 
All others would also be allowed to use, copy and add on to all material on the CD-rom, but  
it would under no circumstance be possible to claim copyright. Also (again similar to Linux)  
every copy or changed version would need to be accompanied by the copyright statement  
(similar to the GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE) so that those who receive it know it is 'open'  
information. And those who who make changes to the CD-rom would need to mark in a  
specific document what was changed on the CD-rom.
 

 
<I>But this will be a lot of work, no?
 
</I>That depends. I thought of starting out by just using websites that are already out there. The  
author has no extra work and will receive more exposure. Also we could integrate collected  
documents (and maybe the Crest SB archives?).
 
At a later point we could try to reach a more sophisticated level.
 

 
<I>If you would have a budget for this project, what would you use it for?
 
</I>Pay (myself? as) a part time editor/webmaster to make the CD-roms.
 
Maybe buying certain material to publish, like older editions of The Last Straw.
 

 
<I>How would you obtain a budget?
 
-</I>On the CD-rom we could ask donations, for a Non Profit Organization handling this project.
 
-Sales of the CD-rom.
 
-Fundraising by the Non Profit Organization.
 

 
<I>Which Non Profit Organization?
 
</I>To me it looks like this would fit perfectly with Builders Without Borders. But if need be we  
will start our own.
 
 
<CENTER>++++++
 
</CENTER>
 
Below I have added the complete copyright statement that goes with Linux software for  
those who find it of interest. (making this the longest email I've ever sent ;-)
 

 
Let me know what you think about the project,
 

 
Warm greetings,
 
Andre de Bouter
<A HREF=mailto:sim.plicity@...
>sim.plicity@...
</A><A HREF=http://perso.club-internet.fr/simplexity/ >http://perso.club-internet.fr/simplexity/ </A>  (under construction)
 

<CENTER>++++++++++
 
</CENTER>Linux is written and distributed under the GNU General Public License which means that its  
source code is freely-distributed and available to the general public. 
 
<CENTER>GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE
 
Version 2, June 1991 
 
</CENTER>Copyright (C) 1989, 1991 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 
675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
 
Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this license document, but  
changing it is not allowed. 
<CENTER>Preamble 
 
</CENTER>The licenses for most software are designed to take away your freedom to share and change  
it. By contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to  
share and change free software--to make sure the software is free for all its users. This  
General Public License applies to most of the Free Software Foundation's software and to  
any other program whose authors commit to using it. (Some other Free Software Foundation  
software is covered by the GNU Library General Public License instead.) You can apply it  
to your programs, too. 
 
When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public  
Licenses are designed to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free  
software (and charge for this service if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if  
you want it, that you can change the software or use pieces of it in new free programs; and  
that you know you can do these things. 
 
To protect your rights, we need to make restrictions that forbid anyone to deny you these  
rights or to ask you to surrender the rights. These restrictions translate to certain  
responsibilities for you if you distribute copies of the software, or if you modify it. 
 
For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether gratis or for a fee, you must  
give the recipients all the rights that you have. You must make sure that they, too, receive or  
can get the source code. And you must show them these terms so they know their rights. 
 
We protect your rights with two steps: (1) copyright the software, and (2) offer you this  
license which gives you legal permission to copy, distribute and/or modify the software. 
 
Also, for each author's protection and ours, we want to make certain that everyone  
understands that there is no warranty for this free software. If the software is modified by  
someone else and passed on, we want its recipients to know that what they have is not the  
original, so that any problems introduced by others will not reflect on the original authors'  
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Finally, any free program is threatened constantly by software patents. We wish to avoid the  
danger that redistributors of a free program will individually obtain patent licenses, in effect  
making the program proprietary. To prevent this, we have made it clear that any patent must  
be licensed for everyone's free use or not licensed at all. 
 
The precise terms and conditions for copying, distribution and modification follow. 
 
<CENTER>GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COPYING,  
DISTRIBUTION AND MODIFICATION 
 
</CENTER>0. This License applies to any program or other work which contains a notice placed by the  
copyright holder saying it may be distributed under the terms of this General Public License.  
The "Program", below, refers to any such program or work, and a "work based on the  
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Activities other than copying, distribution and modification are not covered by this License;  
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from the Program is covered only if its contents constitute a work based on the Program  
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1. You may copy and distribute verbatim copies of the Program's source code as you receive  
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refer to this License and to the absence of any warranty; and give any other recipients of the  
Program a copy of this License along with the Program. 
 
You may charge a fee for the physical act of transferring a copy, and you may at your option  
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a) You must cause the modified files to carry prominent notices stating that  
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b) You must cause any work that you distribute or publish, that in whole or in  
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c) If the modified program normally reads commands interactively when run,  
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These requirements apply to the modified work as a whole. If identifiable sections of that  
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In addition, mere aggregation of another work not based on the Program with the Program  
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3. You may copy and distribute the Program (or a work based on it, under Section 2) in  
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protecting the integrity of the free software distribution system, which is implemented by  
public license practices. Many people have made generous contributions to the wide range of  
software distributed through that system in reliance on consistent application of that system; it  
is up to the author/donor to decide if he or she is willing to distribute software through any  
other system and a licensee cannot impose that choice. 
 
This section is intended to make thoroughly clear what is believed to be a consequence of the  
rest of this License. 
 
8. If the distribution and/or use of the Program is restricted in certain countries either by  
patents or by copyrighted interfaces, the original copyright holder who places the Program  
under this License may add an explicit geographical distribution limitation excluding those  
countries, so that distribution is permitted only in or among countries not thus excluded. In  
such case, this License incorporates the limitation as if written in the body of this License. 
 
9. The Free Software Foundation may publish revised and/or new versions of the General  
Public License from time to time. Such new versions will be similar in spirit to the present  
version, but may differ in detail to address new problems or concerns. 
 
Each version is given a distinguishing version number. If the Program specifies a version  
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<CENTER>NO WARRANTY 
 
</CENTER>11. BECAUSE THE PROGRAM IS LICENSED FREE OF CHARGE, THERE IS NO  
WARRANTY FOR THE PROGRAM, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY  
APPLICABLE LAW. EXCEPT WHEN OTHERWISE STATED IN WRITING THE  
COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES PROVIDE THE PROGRAM  
"AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR  
IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF  
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE  
ENTIRE RISK AS TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PROGRAM  
IS WITH YOU. SHOULD THE PROGRAM PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU ASSUME  
THE COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR OR CORRECTION. 
 
12. IN NO EVENT UNLESS REQUIRED BY APPLICABLE LAW OR AGREED TO  
IN WRITING WILL ANY COPYRIGHT HOLDER, OR ANY OTHER PARTY WHO  
MAY MODIFY AND/OR REDISTRIBUTE THE PROGRAM AS PERMITTED  
ABOVE, BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES, INCLUDING ANY GENERAL,  
SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF  
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LIMITED TO LOSS OF DATA OR DATA BEING RENDERED INACCURATE OR  
LOSSES SUSTAINED BY YOU OR THIRD PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE  
PROGRAM TO OPERATE WITH ANY OTHER PROGRAMS), EVEN IF SUCH  
HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF  
SUCH DAMAGES. 
<CENTER>END OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS 
 
Appendix: How to Apply These Terms to Your New Programs 
 
</CENTER>If you develop a new program, and you want it to be of the greatest possible use to the  
public, the best way to achieve this is to make it free software which everyone can  
redistribute and change under these terms. 
 
To do so, attach the following notices to the program. It is safest to attach them to the start of  
each source file to most effectively convey the exclusion of warranty; and each file should  
have at least the "copyright" line and a pointer to where the full notice is found. 
 
<one line to give the program's name and a brief idea of what it does.>  
Copyright (C) 19yy <name of author> 
 
This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under  
the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free  
Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your option) any  
later version. 
 
This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT  
ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of  
MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  
See the GNU General Public License for more details. 
 
You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along  
with this program; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 675  
Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. 
 
Also add information on how to contact you by electronic and paper mail. 
 
If the program is interactive, make it output a short notice like this when it starts in an  
interactive mode: 
 
Gnomovision version 69, Copyright (C) 19yy name of author Gnomovision  
comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details type `show w'.  
This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it under certain  
conditions; type `show c' for details. 
 
The hypothetical commands `show w' and `show c' should show the appropriate parts of the  
General Public License. Of course, the commands you use may be called something other  
than `show w' and `show c'; they could even be mouse-clicks or menu items--whatever suits  
your program. 
 
You should also get your employer (if you work as a programmer) or your school, if any, to  
sign a "copyright disclaimer" for the program, if necessary. Here is a sample; alter the names: 
 
Yoyodyne, Inc., hereby disclaims all copyright interest in the program  
`Gnomovision' (which makes passes at compilers) written by James Hacker. 
 
<signature of Ty Coon>, 1 April 1989
 
Ty Coon, President of Vice 
 
This General Public License does not permit incorporating your program into proprietary  
programs. If your program is a subroutine library, you may consider it more useful to permit  
linking proprietary applications with the library. If this is what you want to do, use the GNU  
Library General Public License instead of this License. </FONT>
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