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GSBN:new Builders without Borders project



In the squatter community of Anapra outside Juarez, Mexico, most families 
live in houses made of discarded shipping pallets and tar paper with 
uninsulated metal roofs. Such homes are sweltering in summer and freezing 
in winter.

Builders Without Borders proposes to build a home for a family who recently 
lost their house in a fire to demonstrate how residents can build 
comfortable, well-insulated low-cost homes out of straw bales, discarded 
pallets, adobe and broken concrete. You're invited to help with this 
humanitarian effort.

Fifteen Builders Without Borders volunteers will participate in a weeklong 
work party from October 28 through November 32, 2001. We expect to raise 
the walls, install door and window frames, build the roof, and apply the 
first coat of interior plaster. We'll invite the residents of the 
neighborhood to work with us, and in the process, they will learn straw 
bale and other natural building skills.

The home is being built for Jose Luis Rocha, his wife Sylvia, and their 
four children.  After their home burned down last year, he was determined 
to rebuild at the desert's edge on a mesa overlooking the Franklin 
Mountains of West Texas. It's a location where temperatures soar to over 
100 degrees in summer and drop to freezing in winter weather. High winds 
blow all year long.

The planned home will consist of two 4 X 8 meter straw-bale structures with 
a 2 meter "breezeway" in between.  It will rise from a foundation of rammed 
tires and a stemwall of mortared chunks of broken concrete  known to 
natural builders as "urbanite."   Outside, the super-insulating bale walls 
will receive cement stucco, and inside they will be finished with earthen 
plasters.  Adobe walls will divide the interior spaces and provide thermal 
mass, and the site offers good solar aspects.  The roof structure will 
utilize a new technique being developed by architect Alfred von 
Bachmayr  trusses put together from deconstructed shipping pallets!  Our 
estimated cost of materials for this approximately 1000 sq. ft. home is 
less than $3,000.

Jose Luis, a builder by trade, was the maestro of the first straw-bale 
building in the region -- a community center, constructed by the non-profit 
service organization Annunciation House of El Paso.  Jose decided he wanted 
to use the same techniques to rebuild his home but needed 
assistance.  Earlier this year, BWB organized an earthen plaster workshop 
at the Community Center. Project manager Patrick Suhrbier introduced us to 
Jose Luis and suggested his home as a potential BWB project.

This project offers several opportunities for Builders without Borders.  It 
is in the region of many founding members, yet gives us experience 
internationally.  In an area without building codes, we can build 
load-bearing bale walls, and further test the pallet-truss system.  Jose 
Luis is building the foundation, has the skills to complete the project, 
and is also willing to allow his home to be open to visitors.  Several 
border-area building organizations have been curious about straw-bale 
technology, and have been invited to visit the site during 
construction.  Juarez is home to more than 200 colonias which are inhabited 
by workers in factories built just south of the U.S. border. Anapra alone 
has almost 20,000 residents. Most homes are without running water.  Straw 
bales, available locally for about $1 each, are obviously a comfortable and 
affordable alternative. This project will serve as a model that can be 
easily replicated in the future.

Here's how you can help. In addition to organizing the building effort, BWB 
has offered to pay for the roof. The estimated cost of the metal roof 
decking is $2000. We need your cash donations to cover this cost. So far 
about $600 has been raised.  Whatever amount you can afford to contribute 
will be deeply appreciated by the Rocha family and the people of Anapra.

We also invite you to become a member of Builders without Borders for $25 
year /individual, $50 /family. Please mail your check or call in your 
credit card to:
Builders without Borders, 119 Main St., Kingston, NM 88042 505-895-5400

Thank you for sharing our vision.

Best regards,
Catherine Wanek, Editor

The Last Straw Journal
The International Journal of Straw Bale & Natural Building
HC66, Box 119
Hillsboro, NM 88042
(505) 895-5400 /fax (505) 895-3326
thelaststraw@...
http://www.strawhomes.com




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<html>
<font size=3>Dear Colleagues -  (Apologies for sending this twice --
some reported back that this email was empty....!  best regards,
Catherine) 
 
In the squatter community of Anapra outside Juarez, Mexico, most families
live in houses made of discarded shipping pallets and tar paper with
uninsulated metal roofs. Such homes are sweltering in summer and freezing
in winter. 
 
Builders Without Borders proposes to build a home for a family who
recently lost their house in a fire to demonstrate how residents can
build comfortable, well-insulated low-cost homes out of straw bales,
discarded pallets, adobe and broken concrete. You?re invited to help with
this humanitarian effort. 
 
Fifteen Builders Without Borders volunteers will participate in a
weeklong work party from October 28 through November 32, 2001. We expect
to raise the walls, install door and window frames, build the roof, and
apply the first coat of interior plaster. We?ll invite the residents of
the neighborhood to work with us, and in the process, they will learn
straw bale and other natural building skills. 
 
The home is being built for Jose Luis Rocha, his wife Sylvia, and their
four children.  After their home burned down last year, he was
determined to rebuild at the desert?s edge on a mesa overlooking the
Franklin Mountains of West Texas. It?s a location where temperatures soar
to over 100 degrees in summer and drop to freezing in winter weather.
High winds blow all year long. 
 
The planned home will consist of two 4 X 8 meter straw-bale structures
with a 2 meter ?breezeway? in between.  It will rise from a
foundation of rammed tires and a stemwall of mortared chunks of broken
concrete  known to natural builders as ?urbanite.?  
Outside, the super-insulating bale walls will receive cement stucco, and
inside they will be finished with earthen plasters.  Adobe walls
will divide the interior spaces and provide thermal mass, and the site
offers good solar aspects.  The roof structure will utilize a new
technique being developed by architect Alfred von Bachmayr  trusses
put together from deconstructed shipping pallets!  Our estimated
cost of materials for this approximately 1000 sq. ft. home is less than
$3,000. 
 
Jose Luis, a builder by trade, was the maestro of the first straw-bale
building in the region -- a community center, constructed by the
non-profit service organization Annunciation House of El Paso.  Jose
decided he wanted to use the same techniques to rebuild his home but
needed assistance.  Earlier this year, BWB organized an earthen
plaster workshop at the Community Center. Project manager Patrick
Suhrbier introduced us to Jose Luis and suggested his home as a potential
BWB project. 
 
This project offers several opportunities for Builders without
Borders.  It is in the region of many founding members, yet gives us
experience internationally.  In an area without building codes, we
can build load-bearing bale walls, and further test the pallet-truss
system.  Jose Luis is building the foundation, has the skills to
complete the project, and is also willing to allow his home to be open to
visitors.  Several border-area building organizations have been
curious about straw-bale technology, and have been invited to visit the
site during construction.  Juarez is home to more than 200 colonias
which are inhabited by workers in factories built just south of the U.S.
border. Anapra alone has almost 20,000 residents. Most homes are without
running water.  Straw bales, available locally for about $1 each,
are obviously a comfortable and affordable alternative. This project will
serve as a model that can be easily replicated in the future. 
 
Here?s how you can help. In addition to organizing the building effort,
BWB has offered to pay for the roof. The estimated cost of the metal roof
decking is $2000. We need your cash donations to cover this cost. So far
about $600 has been raised.  Whatever amount you can afford to
contribute will be deeply appreciated by the Rocha family and the people
of Anapra. 
 
We also invite you to become a member of Builders without Borders for $25
year /individual, $50 /family. Please mail your check or call in your
credit card to:  
Builders without Borders, 119 Main St., Kingston, NM 88042
505-895-5400 
 
Thank you for sharing our vision. 

Best regards, 
Catherine Wanek, Editor 
 
<i>The Last Straw Journal 
</i>The International Journal of Straw Bale &amp; Natural Building  
HC66, Box 119  
Hillsboro, NM 88042  
(505) 895-5400 /fax (505) 895-3326  
thelaststraw@...  
</font><font size=3 color="#0000FF"><u><a href="http://www.strawhomes.com/"; eudora="autourl">http://www.strawhomes.com</a> 
 
 
 
</font></u></html>

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