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GSBN: Digest for 12/4/01



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-> Re: GSBN:Re: 365 days to go International SB Corroboree 2002
     by Huff 'n' Puff Constructions huffnpuff@...
-> Lime and Cement Plaster
     by Kelly Lerner klerner@...
-> Re: GSBN:Lime and Cement Plaster
     by Huff 'n' Puff Constructions huffnpuff@...
-> Re: GSBN:Lime and Cement Plaster
     by "Helen & Per Bernard" imagine@...
-> Re: GSBN:Lime and Cement Plaster
     by Thangmaker@...


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Date: 4 Dec 2001 05:15:42 -0600
From: Huff 'n' Puff Constructions huffnpuff@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: 365 days to go International SB Corroboree 2002

Dear Joyce

Thanks for that still have heaps to do and we are on the road again back on
the 15 December so I will write to you when I return.

Salaams JG.



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Date: 4 Dec 2001 11:27:18 -0600
From: Kelly Lerner klerner@...
Subject: Lime and Cement Plaster

Hi All,
On a residential straw-bale project in Capitola, CA (coastal California 
climate, but a protected site with little driving rain), I've specified an 
exterior plaster 1 part cement: 1 part lime: 6 parts sand.

The plaster contractor, an great experienced plasterer say he thinks the 
mix is just too "hot". He's worried about the mix being so alkaline that it 
will eat up the stucco mould (around the windows and doors) and will be 
dangerous for his guys to work with.

He's recommending a mix of 1 bag cement: 1/4 bay lime and 25 shovels of 
sand. (this is all via the general contractor so I'm not sure of the 
volumetric measurements of this mix - shovels compared to bags).

I'm looking for a very vapor permeable plaster - his mix doesn't sound like 
enough lime to me.

What have your experiences been? Any problems being burned by a 1:1:6 mix? 
Any complaints from contractors? Your thoughts please.

Kelly



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Date: 4 Dec 2001 14:48:26 -0600
From: Huff 'n' Puff Constructions huffnpuff@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Lime and Cement Plaster

Dear Kelly

"He's recommending a mix of 1 bag cement: 1/4 bay lime and 25 shovels of
sand. (this is all via the general contractor so I'm not sure of the
volumetric measurements of this mix - shovels compared to bags)."

Kelly this mix looks like 5/6:1:1 which is almost what you have specified.  We
get 5-6 good shovels from a 40 kg bag of cement and about the same 5
shovels from a 20 kg bag of lime.  So mate I would say you are comparing
apples to apples just the description is Grannie Smiths to Red Delicious.
I suppose it depends on the size of the shovel!

When we used cement in the past we always used a 5:1:1 mix for the scratch
coat which went on a average 25 mm thick the brown coat 5:1:half a lime
on 10 mm thick and the colour coat 6:1:zero lime on 3 mm thick.

Never had any problems with it being a hot mix, never had any problems with it
eating timber.  I am very surprised at his reaction as most render
mixes in cement are of the same ratio for brick and cement block rendering. 
Best to ask him to do a shovel test per bag of cement and per bag of
lime.

Having said that I do not like cement period, on straw bales, I feel that long
term we will get trouble of sorts.  Mainly from moisture from within
the building as well as long term cracking and deterioration of the cement.

I naturally prefer earthen renders with a lime putty finish with Golden
Ganmain Chaff of course.

Kind regards The Straw Wolf
http://strawbale.archinet.com.au
61 2 6927 6027



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Date: 4 Dec 2001 15:58:06 -0600
From: "Helen & Per Bernard" imagine@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Lime and Cement Plaster

Hi Kelly
We usally specify 1 part cement: 1 part lime: 5 part sand, and haven't
experienced any problems. We are in a 900mm rain fall area in Victoria,
Australia.

regards
Per Bernard

- ----- Original Message -----
From: Kelly Lerner klerner@...
To: GSBN@...; CASBA Listserve
casba-members@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2001 4:21 AM
Subject: GSBN:Lime and Cement Plaster


> Hi All,
> On a residential straw-bale project in Capitola, CA (coastal California
> climate, but a protected site with little driving rain), I've specified an
> exterior plaster 1 part cement: 1 part lime: 6 parts sand.
>
> The plaster contractor, an great experienced plasterer say he thinks the
> mix is just too "hot". He's worried about the mix being so alkaline that
it
> will eat up the stucco mould (around the windows and doors) and will be
> dangerous for his guys to work with.
>
> He's recommending a mix of 1 bag cement: 1/4 bay lime and 25 shovels of
> sand. (this is all via the general contractor so I'm not sure of the
> volumetric measurements of this mix - shovels compared to bags).
>
> I'm looking for a very vapor permeable plaster - his mix doesn't sound
like
> enough lime to me.
>
> What have your experiences been? Any problems being burned by a 1:1:6 mix?
> Any complaints from contractors? Your thoughts please.
>
> Kelly
>

>
>
>



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Date: 4 Dec 2001 19:08:54 -0600
From: Thangmaker@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Lime and Cement Plaster

Kelly,  
        If I'm not mistaken type N masonry is close to 50% portland 50% lime. 

I have  used 3 parts lime, 1 part portland.  No problem.  Lime is worse for 
some people to handle than others.  It only dries my skin out.  I've seen 
people who blister badly by having it on their skin.   That issue of TLS that 
Bill Steen put together last year was very informative.   The problem with 
adding the cement is that you loose the advantage of easy repairs which pure 
lime plaster gives you.  So you have a soft plaster (which tend to need 
repairs eventually) which is hard to repair.  Breathablility is where we 
could really use some facts...though they may be too hard to 
understand........

Cheers
Frank


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