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GSBN: Digest for 3/3/03



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-> slab edge insulation
     by bainbridge bainbrid@...


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Date: 3 Mar 2003 13:07:55 -0600
From: bainbridge bainbrid@...
Subject: slab edge insulation


Bob,

Here is a followup on insulating concrete for slab edge, I haven't 
talked to Ken and Polly yet about the foamed concrete insulation they 
used.

Physical properties of perlite concrete vary according to mix 
designs. Perlite concrete can be made with a dry density of 20 
lb/ft3(320 kg/m3) or with the addition of sand or other aggregates up 
to 90 lb/ft3 (1440 kg/m3). The lower the density, the higher the 
insulating value.

For most uses to maintain a proper balance between insulation value 
and compressive strength, a 1:6 (one part portland cement by volume 
to 6 parts perlite by volume) mix is chosen with a density between 
24-30 lb/cf3 (384 and 480 kg/m3).

This provides a k factor range of 0.58 to 0.66 Btu-inch/h-ft2-F 
(0.085 to 0.095 W/m-k) (R-value = 1.7 inch,  3 inches = 5.1) and a 
compressive strength of 125 to 200 psi (986 to 1378 Pa).

At the garden center yesterday perlite was $16 for 4 cu ft.

I used some perlite mix stucco at CMM sbale building and it was a 
dream. Lightweight and easy to lift even at the end of the day.

Probably not good on the net energy front compared to pumice crete - 
but more readily available.

http://www.schundler.com/perlcon.htm
http://www.perlite.org/index.htm
- -- 
David Bainbridge
Environmental Studies Coordinator
CAS
Alliant International University
10455 Pomerado Road
San Diego, CA 92131

Fax (858) 635-4730
Ph (858) 635-4616
http://academic.alliant.edu/bainbridge/
http://www.sustainableenergy.org/resources/technologies/solar_passive.htm
http:SustainableSources.com

The future isn't something hidden in a corner. The future is 
something we build in the present. Paulo Freire


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<!doctype html public "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
<html><head><style type="text/css"><!--
blockquote, dl, ul, ol, li { margin-top: 0 ; margin-bottom: 0 }
 --></style><title>slab edge insulation</title></head><body>
Bob,
 
Here is a followup on insulating concrete for slab edge, I
haven't talked to Ken and Polly yet about the foamed concrete
insulation they used.
<font color="#000000"> </font>
<font color="#000000">Physical properties of perlite concrete
vary according to mix designs. Perlite concrete can be made with a
dry density of 20 lb/ft3(320 kg/m3) or with the addition of sand or
other aggregates up to 90 lb/ft3 (1440 kg/m3). The lower the density,
the higher the insulating value.</font>
<font color="#000000"> </font>
<font color="#000000">For most uses to maintain a proper balance
between insulation value and compressive strength, a 1:6 (one part
portland cement by volume to 6 parts perlite by volume) mix is chosen
with a density between 24-30 lb/cf3 (384 and 480 kg/m3).</font>
<font color="#000000"> </font>
<font color="#000000">This provides a k factor range of 0.58 to
0.66 Btu-inch/h-ft2-F (0.085 to 0.095 W/m-k) (<b>R-value = 1.7
inch,  3 inches = 5.1</b>) and a compressive strength of 125 to
200 psi (986 to 1378 Pa).</font>
<font color="#000000"> </font>
<font color="#000000">At the garden center yesterday perlite was
$16 for 4 cu ft.</font>
<font color="#000000"> </font>
<font color="#000000">I used some perlite mix stucco at CMM
sbale building and it was a dream. Lightweight and easy to lift even
at the end of the day.</font>
<font color="#000000"> </font>
<font color="#000000">Probably not good on the net energy front
compared to pumice crete - but more readily available.</font>
<font color="#000000"> </font>
<font
color="#000000">http://www.schundler.com/perlcon.htm</font>
<font
color="#000000">http://www.perlite.org/index.htm</font>

<font color="#000000">--  
David Bainbridge 
Environmental Studies Coordinator 
CAS 
Alliant International University 
10455 Pomerado Road 
San Diego, CA 92131 
 
Fax (858) 635-4730 
Ph (858) 635-4616 
http://academic.alliant.edu/bainbridge/ 
http://www.sustainableenergy.org/resource<span
></span>s/technologies/solar_passive.htm  
http:SustainableSources.com</font>
<font color="#000000"> </font>
<font color="#000000">The future isn't something hidden in a
corner. The future is something we build in the present. Paulo
Freire</font><font face="Times New Roman" size="+3"
color="#000000"></font>
</body>
</html>
- --============_-1165405341==_ma============--


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