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GSBN: Digest for 10/20/04



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---------------------------------------------------------------------


-> RE: GSBN:Re: Moisture in SBW
     by "strawbalefutures" info@...
-> RE: GSBN:Re: Moisture in SBW
     by Strawnet@...
-> Re: GSBN:Re: Moisture in SBW
     by Derek Roff derek@...
-> RE: GSBN:Re: Moisture in SBW
     by jfstraube@...
-> Re: Moisture in SBW
     by "Danny & Fionna Buck" fiodanbuck@...


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 20 Oct 2004 04:49:51 -0600
From: "strawbalefutures" info@...
Subject: RE: GSBN:Re: Moisture in SBW

Hi Danny
Sorry to hear of these problems but as John Straube has also said, it can
happen in any house whatever it's made from. We've had to repair damp in
some buildings over here. The main thing is that you've had a good look at
where it is and what's causing it.
So I agree the main issue is to put an overhang on the roof, and possibly a
pitch as well, flat roofs are notorious for letting in the weather.
The elastomeric stucco - that must be a coating on the top? I would hesitate
to sand blast it as you may lose some of the straw as well. We've taken
plaster off straw using heavy hammers and claws, you can scrape it out of
the straw - but we plaster directly onto straw, was a metal coat used here?
But I would take out all the sills and put a damp proof course under them,
paying attention to laying it up the sides, in agreement with John here. If
the sill is laid onto straw and not onto cement then you can scrape out a
slot in which to insert the damp proof course without removing the sill.
With the stucco a breathable flexible plaster would be better, either lime
or clay with limewash. Cracking in rigid plasters like cement, which then
let in moisture, is a common problem. But you will always have the problem
of stucco onto the cement horizontals. I'm not surprised the cement is as
wet or wetter than the straw. It is what we call a 'wet' material and we
wouldn't be able to get away with it here in the UK. If there is any
moisture in the walls it will tend to be drawn to the cement.
Your best bet is to take the stucco off in the area of damp, take out any
obviously wet bales and replace them (it's not as bad as it sounds, we've
successfully replaced bales in a loadbearing house). If you want to dry the
walls out without replacing straw then we did it on one house by making
holes the whole width of the wall in the areas of greatest moisture, and
letting a drying wind blow through it. This can only be done in the drying
season! Winter is not a good time to take the stucco off- maybe leave this
part of the repair till spring/summer? Make sure you deal with all the damp,
then replaster.

Hope you get it sorted out.
Best wishes
Barbara Jones

- -----Original Message-----
From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...]On";>mailto:GSBN@...]On</a> Behalf Of Danny &amp;
Fionna Buck
Sent: 20 October 2004 00:56
To: GSBN
Subject: GSBN:Re: Moisture in SBW


Hello everyone;

Haven't spoken up for a while, but am following what's going on. Thanks for
all the good SB energy.

I have been called in to look at a house that I did not build, but was
showing a spot of moisture in one of the interior walls in the mud
plaster.After some investigation, we have found extensive moisture
throughout one wing of the house.This wing has a flat roof with no overhang.
The other two wings have overhangs and are testing dry. Moisture in the
former is as high as 40% in spots, but a lot of areas in the low 20% range.
The pattern seems to be mainly under the flagstone window sills (about 8"
deep and probably without any flashing under the flagstone.). The other main
factor seems to be that the entire house has elastomeric stucco. The owner
has been caulking cracks in the stucco, which appear to be caused by
moisture buildup- ie the areas along cracks tend to be very wet just below
the stucco.

The house was built with a system local to our area caled "bale block". This
a system where two 4" diameter holes are drilled through each bale prior to
it being laid into the wall. After two courses have been laid, a 4" PVC is
used as a form and a reinforced concrete column is poured through each
drilled hole, the PVC then being extracted. At every other course, a 2"
reinforced "beam" is poured the width of the bale. Thus we have a concrete
grid running vertically and horizontally throughout the wall.

The owners are committed to making the house right (and rightly so for
everyone's sake). Here are some questions under consideration:

1. We want to strip the house entirely of the elastomeric stucco, replacing
it with a cementitious color coat where the walls are dry. We are thinking
of sand blasting it off. any other ideas?

2. The stone sills run the full depth of the straw bales, with the windows
set on top of them. Is there any realistic way to make this waterproof
without tearing out the entire sill?

3. We are expecting to tear out straw, wherever it is wet. Ibelieve it will
be difficult but doable in spite of all of the concrete. I am thinking that
we can get some drying once the walls are opened up, but doubt that we can
expect to really dry more than a few inches from the surface. Can we dry
deeper than that? What parameters shoud we use in deciding how much straw to
extract? When the moisture meter hits concrete in wet areas, the concrete is
as wet or wetter than the bales. Why?

4. Once straw is pulled out, with the concrete grid still in place, what can
we possibly refill the walls with?. The moisture tends towards the outside
of the walls, so we are hoping to keep the interior surfaces intact and just
work from the outside.When refilling the walls, we want to keep moisture to
a minimum, so straw clay or other poured or puddled materials seem unlikely.
I do not see how to use straw realistically- would that be possible? We are
going into winter here.

5. I have not had a chance to investigate any possible coverage from
liability insurance the original contractor may have carried. Would we
expect this to apply? The house is about 4-5 years old.

I am sure that other questions will arise as we proceed. This a very
beautiful home, with lovely interior finishes. One problem inside is that
the clay floors are wearing poorly around furniture. They want it replaced
with colored concrete. Any ideas on this?

Look forward to a response. Anyone want to do some volunteer (or perhaps
paid) work on forensic straw bale?

Cheers

Danny Buck
Santa Fe, NM

- ----
GSBN is an invitation-only forum of key individuals and representatives of
regional straw construction organizations. The costs of operating this list
are underwritten by The Last Straw Journal in exchange for use of the GSBN
as an advisory board and technical editing arm.

For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list, send
email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
- ----





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 20 Oct 2004 11:06:47 -0600
From: Strawnet@...
Subject: RE: GSBN:Re: Moisture in SBW

Hello Danny, et al...

I just wanted to throw in a few cents worth of comments on this subject
as I have been involved in a few houses with minor to major moisture
problems. Generally they have been as the Master of Moisture, John
Straube, described - related to poor design decisions and/or poor
detailing around windows, etc.

My basic design philosophy in general -

First principle - Design problems out of, not into buildings. In other
words think about what you're doing and what is going to happen over time
and how you can mitigate the bad things by design rather than through the
application of technology, high-tech materials, etc.

Second principle - Simplicity is its own reward. This makes carrying out
the first principle much easier...

Third principle - The roof should cover the tops of the walls...and then
some. This should be an absolute no-brainer for straw bale. Many of you
know my long-standing dislike of Santa Fe style architecture, but this
goes double for straw bale - parapet roofs, vigas sticking out of the
wall, roof drains penetrating the walls - all totally violate the first
two principles.

Some of you may have heard me say this before, but for those who haven't
- - a few years ago a woman asked during a presentation I was giving if it
wasn't true that straw bale buildings should only be built in dry places.
I said, after pausing to think about it, "Yes, that is true. But, you can
design and build dry places just about anywhere. Which is how I would
like you to think about what you're doing when you're designing a straw
bale building."

So, Fourth principle - design dry places for your bales...

Okay, enough pontification...

The last thing I'll share is about windows and window sills. John aptly
pointed out that they leak - they always leak (unless you've been smart
enough to design them into really dry places). So protecting the bales
beneath the windows requires that you catch the water under the window
and make sure it gets all the way out of the wall. In other words,
ideally you would have a pan of sorts under the window, sloped slightly
to the outside, extending a bit beyond each side and with a lip at the
back and on each end (so water can't just run off the ends), and
extending out beyond the exterior wall surface, with a drip edge - so
that any water that leaks through or runs down the sides of the window
ends up in this pan and is shown the exit. You can make these pans out of
metal, plastic, ice and water shield, cast this shape into a concrete
sill, anything that will keep the water from leaking through it, but the
principle thing here is to make sure that the water can't get into the
wall below the window. You can put your window sill material, whatever it
is, on top of this pan flashing being careful not to punch unsealed holes
in it when you install the sill. It can take a little thought and
ingenuity to do this, but it assures you that when the windows leak the
water leaves the building.

That old practice of just putting roofing paper or plastic over the top
of the bales and setting your windows on it and then plastering over it
just leads the water down inside the plaster to the bales wherever the
water protection ends unless it runs continuously down the wall under the
window to below the bales (and we don't recommend doing that). It just
temporarily moved the problem down, didn't solve it.

That's all for now. Glad to see this discussion here.

David

David Eisenberg, Director

Development Center for Appropriate Technology
P.O. Box 27513, Tucson, AZ  85726-7513
(520) 624-6628 voice / (520) 798-3701 fax
strawnet@...
<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.dcat.net";>http://www.dcat.net</a>

The Development Center for Appropriate Technology is a 501(c)(3)
non-profit organization. Our primary support comes from charitable
contributions from individuals and businesses, from our educational and
training programs and consulting services, and to a lesser degree today
from foundation grants. Please consider helping support our vital work.
Our mission is to enhance the health of the planet and our communities by
promoting a shift to sustainable construction and development practices
through leadership, strategic relationships, and education. To learn
about DCAT's work and how you can support it, please visit our website at
www.dcat.net



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 20 Oct 2004 17:15:18 -0600
From: Derek Roff derek@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Moisture in SBW

Hi, Danny,

I am guessing that this house is in the Santa Fe, New Mexico area.  I grew
up in Santa Fe style houses in Albuquerque, which has half the rainfall of
Santa Fe.  None of the houses I lived in were strawbale, but all the
flat-roofed ones had serious, recurrent moisture problems in the walls and
ceilings.  This won't surprise many builders, but most home buyers seem to
be unaware of the risk.

I concur with John and David, as I suspect you do.  Protecting the walls
with a pitched roof and proper overhangs is the easiest way to the
long-term success of your repairs, and probably the only reliable approach.
I hope the owners can be convinced of the beauty as well as the superiority
of the other Northern New Mexico tradition, pitched metal roofs.

I have a few comments on some of your items.  On item 1, I think we need
more information on the current coatings, both inside and out.  You mention
"mud" on the inside, which I take to mean an earthen plaster.  Does it also
contain a binder, oil, or other admixture?

Outside, my guess is a little different than Barbara's.  I am guessing that
you have a thin (1/8" or less) coating of the elastomeric, over a more
conventional one or two coats of portland cement/sand stucco, with embedded
stucco wire mesh.  Is this correct?  If not, please tell us what you can
about the coating.

Item 2.  It seems likely that you will need to remove the bales below each
window where the moisture is really high.  It may be possible to leave the
sill and window in place, and install your proper flashing and drain pan
underneath the sill, before reinstalling the insulation.  This assumes
reworking at least some of the plaster inside and out, but that is probably
a given, in replacing the bales.

Item 3.  Concrete loves moistur,e probably as much or more than straw does.
I am not surprised that you have found it also to be very wet.  Drying is a
challenge, especially beginning in late October.  Adding heat, as John
suggested, is a mixed blessing.  It speeds drying, but promotes the growing
conditions for mold.  Drying at lower temperature can inhibit mold growth.
However, this requires low humidity and lots of air movement.  Standard
fans will move a lot of air, but not with any pressure or penetration.  The
best available tools for drying that I know of are woodworkers' dust
collectors.  Portable dust collectors can be found for $100-$200.  These
radial blowers can suck and/or blow against moderate static pressure.
Therefore, they can move some air through a bale, and get a little
penetration in your drying.  Depending on the situation, using a duct to
suck air from and through the straw to be dried may be the most effective
approach.  Lots of air movement is most important, whether you add heat or
not.  Drilling small holes in the bales, perhaps 1" in diameter, might make
it possible to increase the depth to which you could dry the bales.
Restuffing the holes afterwards would be a simple task.

I've often wondered if injecting an inert gas under pressure could help dry
bales with deeper penetration and less risk of mold.  Nitrogen and carbon
dioxide are inexpensive, and fairly inert.  The bottles used by welders are
portable, and contain no water.  Forcing the gas through a damp bale, the
gas would pick up a great deal of moisture from the straw as it warmed to
room temperature.  I don't think this would be feasible for large areas,
but might be worth a try in a small, wet, complex location.  Since I
haven't done this experiment, I wonder if the nitrogen or CO2 might
actually be food for some micro-organism.  I would bet that a truly inert
gas like argon would be too expensive to use.

Item 4.  Like you, I see problems with inserting new bales into the bale
block grid, to replace the bales that must be removed.  I don't know of a
workable material that would provide the solidity and support to the
plaster surfaces that the bales did.  Perhaps you can build in some sort of
sheathing or substrate in those areas, and insulate with rice hulls or
blown-in cellulose.  Particularly below the windows, and in small areas,
rice hulls seem like a good choice to me.

Item 5.  It seems like the designer and his/her insurance might also be
involved.  If the builders followed the architects instructions,
particularly on flashing and window details, then their liability may be
limited.  The overall roof design is lame, but since it is traditional, I
doubt that the flaws in the roof design will be covered.  Ignoring modern
window and door details might create a liability.

On the earthen floors, I would talk to an expert before replacing them.
There are probably some good folks in Santa Fe.  I know that the crews in
Crestone have had great success with rugged.  Talmath Messenbrink is one
authority that I would want to look at the floor, before I did anything
drastic.

I'm going in for foot surgery in two days, but after recovery, if it is
still timely, I would be happy to volunteer a little time and see if I
could help on the project.

Best wishes,

Derek



- --On Tuesday, October 19, 2004 5:56 PM -0600 Danny &amp; Fionna Buck
fiodanbuck@... wrote:

> Hello everyone;
>
> Haven't spoken up for a while, but am following what's going on. Thanks
> for all the good SB energy.
>
> I have been called in to look at a house that I did not build, but was
> showing a spot of moisture in one of the interior walls in the mud
> plaster.After some investigation, we have found extensive moisture
> throughout one wing of the house.This wing has a flat roof with no
> overhang. The other two wings have overhangs and are testing dry.
> Moisture in the former is as high as 40% in spots, but a lot of areas in
> the low 20% range. The pattern seems to be mainly under the flagstone
> window sills (about 8" deep and probably without any flashing under the
> flagstone.). The other main factor seems to be that the entire house has
> elastomeric stucco. The owner has been caulking cracks in the stucco,
> which appear to be caused by moisture buildup- ie the areas along cracks
> tend to be very wet just below the stucco.
>
> The house was built with a system local to our area caled "bale block".
> This a system where two 4" diameter holes are drilled through each bale
> prior to it being laid into the wall. After two courses have been laid, a
> 4" PVC is used as a form and a reinforced concrete column is poured
> through each drilled hole, the PVC then being extracted. At every other
> course, a 2" reinforced "beam" is poured the width of the bale. Thus we
> have a concrete grid running vertically and horizontally throughout the
> wall.
>
> The owners are committed to making the house right (and rightly so for
> everyone's sake). Here are some questions under consideration:
>
> 1. We want to strip the house entirely of the elastomeric stucco,
> replacing it with a cementitious color coat where the walls are dry. We
> are thinking of sand blasting it off. any other ideas?
>
> 2. The stone sills run the full depth of the straw bales, with the windows
> set on top of them. Is there any realistic way to make this waterproof
> without tearing out the entire sill?
>
> 3. We are expecting to tear out straw, wherever it is wet. Ibelieve it
> will be difficult but doable in spite of all of the concrete. I am
> thinking that we can get some drying once the walls are opened up, but
> doubt that we can expect to really dry more than a few inches from the
> surface. Can we dry deeper than that? What parameters shoud we use in
> deciding how much straw to extract? When the moisture meter hits concrete
> in wet areas, the concrete is as wet or wetter than the bales. Why?
>
> 4. Once straw is pulled out, with the concrete grid still in place, what
> can we possibly refill the walls with?. The moisture tends towards the
> outside of the walls, so we are hoping to keep the interior surfaces
> intact and just work from the outside.When refilling the walls, we want
> to keep moisture to a minimum, so straw clay or other poured or puddled
> materials seem unlikely. I do not see how to use straw realistically-
> would that be possible? We are going into winter here.
>
> 5. I have not had a chance to investigate any possible coverage from
> liability insurance the original contractor may have carried. Would we
> expect this to apply? The house is about 4-5 years old.
>
> I am sure that other questions will arise as we proceed. This a very
> beautiful home, with lovely interior finishes. One problem inside is that
> the clay floors are wearing poorly around furniture. They want it replaced
> with colored concrete. Any ideas on this?
>
> Look forward to a response. Anyone want to do some volunteer (or perhaps
> paid) work on forensic straw bale?
>
> Cheers
>
> Danny Buck
> Santa Fe, NM
>
> ----
> GSBN is an invitation-only forum of key individuals and representatives
> of regional straw construction organizations. The costs of operating this
> list are underwritten by The Last Straw Journal in exchange for use of
> the GSBN as an advisory board and technical editing arm.
>
> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list,
> send email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
> ----
>



Derek Roff
Language Learning Center
Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
Internet: derek@...



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 20 Oct 2004 18:07:19 -0600
From: jfstraube@...
Subject: RE: GSBN:Re: Moisture in SBW

Lots of good ideas coming out here
I thought I would comment on the inert gas drying idea.  The reason
nitrogen will promote drying is that it is bottled under high pressure
and water vapor is removed in the factory.  In general it is very dry
and has a low RH.  Any air that you can find with low RH will dry with
the same efficacy as Argon, Nitrogen etc, provided they all have low RH.
This air can be created by heating the air (thus dropping RH) or by
using dessicant driers (expensive but effective).

Mold growth peaks in the 65-90 F range.  Above this temp, growth
actually decreases due to heat stress and fast drying.  So blowing 75 F
air on the straw might cause some problems (cause of the heat) but not
much relative to ambient air and non-dry air.  When I said warm air I
meant 120-160F supply which when it mingles drops in temperature
somewhat.  I doubt that the warmth will accelerate mold relative to the
very fast drying.

Heating the interior plaster to 90 F and NOT ventilating might do just
what Derek says, so heating must be combined with sufficient air
movement to ensure drying.

Dr John Straube
Balanced Solutions Inc.
Balanced Solutions for the Building Industry
P: 519 741 7920
<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.balancedsolutions.com";>http://www.balancedsolutions.com</a>


- -----Original Message-----
From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] On Behalf Of Derek Roff
Sent: October 20, 2004 18:57
To: GSBN
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Moisture in SBW
Item 3.  Concrete loves moistur,e probably as much or more than straw
does. I am not surprised that you have found it also to be very wet.
Drying is a challenge, especially beginning in late October.  Adding
heat, as John suggested, is a mixed blessing.  It speeds drying, but
promotes the growing conditions for mold.  Drying at lower temperature
can inhibit mold growth. However, this requires low humidity and lots of
air movement.  Standard fans will move a lot of air, but not with any
pressure or penetration.  The best available tools for drying that I
know of are woodworkers' dust collectors.  Portable dust collectors can
be found for $100-$200.  These radial blowers can suck and/or blow
against moderate static pressure. Therefore, they can move some air
through a bale, and get a little penetration in your drying.  Depending
on the situation, using a duct to suck air from and through the straw to
be dried may be the most effective approach.  Lots of air movement is
most important, whether you add heat or not.  Drilling small holes in
the bales, perhaps 1" in diameter, might make it possible to increase
the depth to which you could dry the bales. Restuffing the holes
afterwards would be a simple task.

I've often wondered if injecting an inert gas under pressure could help
dry bales with deeper penetration and less risk of mold.  Nitrogen and
carbon dioxide are inexpensive, and fairly inert.  The bottles used by
welders are portable, and contain no water.  Forcing the gas through a
damp bale, the gas would pick up a great deal of moisture from the straw
as it warmed to room temperature.  I don't think this would be feasible
for large areas, but might be worth a try in a small, wet, complex
location.  Since I haven't done this experiment, I wonder if the
nitrogen or CO2 might actually be food for some micro-organism.  I would
bet that a truly inert gas like argon would be too expensive to use.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 20 Oct 2004 21:07:21 -0600
From: "Danny &amp; Fionna Buck" fiodanbuck@...
Subject: Re: Moisture in SBW

Hello again-

It's great to hear the thoughtful response that you have been providing.

A little clarification perhaps on the stucco. The process for the
application of the stucco that I can discern from photographs of
construction is that diamond metal lath was attached to the bales around the
window and door openings and in at least a two foot wide strip up each
corner of the building. The field of the bales was without any netting or
other metal reinforcement.

The first or "scratch coat" of cement stucco was applied with a gun,
embedding it thoroughly into the straw and leaving a fair amount of
stucco-coated straw protruding from the surface. I believe the second or
"brown" coat of cement stucco was then trowelled on forming  a smooth
surface. The final or "color " coat was the elastomeric coat, also trowelled
on. It is similar to latex paint with some aggregate in it for texture. It
stretches as it peels when you pull it off and it provides a very good vapor
barrier, keeping rain and exterior moisture out of the wall, but not
allowing any moisture out of the wall either.

Our idea for repair is to keep the first two coats intact, where the walls
are dry, and just remove and replace the elsatomeric (1/16th of an inch +/-)
with a cementitious color coat. Thus the question of sandblasting.

I like Derek's idea of blown cellulose, as it dries pretty rapidly. I am
also thinking of refilling the walls with flakes of bales and then tying
stucco netting over them with tie wire that has been wrapped around the 4"
concrete columns (on 18" centers running vertical the height of the wall.) A
point of clarification is that there are no blocks in the wall, rather the
bales are used as blocks because they have drilled cores that are grouted
with concrete- as blocks are.

On the insurance issue, the contractor was also the architect, carrying both
licenses, I believe.

Thanks again for the feedback

Danny Buck


- ----- Original Message -----
From: "Danny &amp; Fionna Buck" fiodanbuck@...
To: "GSBN" GSBN@...
Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 5:56 PM
Subject: Re: Moisture in SBW


> Hello everyone;
>
> Haven't spoken up for a while, but am following what's going on. Thanks
for
> all the good SB energy.
>
> I have been called in to look at a house that I did not build, but was
> showing a spot of moisture in one of the interior walls in the mud
> plaster.After some investigation, we have found extensive moisture
> throughout one wing of the house.This wing has a flat roof with no
overhang.
> The other two wings have overhangs and are testing dry. Moisture in the
> former is as high as 40% in spots, but a lot of areas in the low 20%
range.
> The pattern seems to be mainly under the flagstone window sills (about 8"
> deep and probably without any flashing under the flagstone.). The other
main
> factor seems to be that the entire house has elastomeric stucco. The owner
> has been caulking cracks in the stucco, which appear to be caused by
> moisture buildup- ie the areas along cracks tend to be very wet just below
> the stucco.
>
> The house was built with a system local to our area caled "bale block".
This
> a system where two 4" diameter holes are drilled through each bale prior
to
> it being laid into the wall. After two courses have been laid, a 4" PVC is
> used as a form and a reinforced concrete column is poured through each
> drilled hole, the PVC then being extracted. At every other course, a 2"
> reinforced "beam" is poured the width of the bale. Thus we have a concrete
> grid running vertically and horizontally throughout the wall.
>
> The owners are committed to making the house right (and rightly so for
> everyone's sake). Here are some questions under consideration:
>
> 1. We want to strip the house entirely of the elastomeric stucco,
replacing
> it with a cementitious color coat where the walls are dry. We are thinking
> of sand blasting it off. any other ideas?
>
> 2. The stone sills run the full depth of the straw bales, with the windows
> set on top of them. Is there any realistic way to make this waterproof
> without tearing out the entire sill?
>
> 3. We are expecting to tear out straw, wherever it is wet. Ibelieve it
will
> be difficult but doable in spite of all of the concrete. I am thinking
that
> we can get some drying once the walls are opened up, but doubt that we can
> expect to really dry more than a few inches from the surface. Can we dry
> deeper than that? What parameters shoud we use in deciding how much straw
to
> extract? When the moisture meter hits concrete in wet areas, the concrete
is
> as wet or wetter than the bales. Why?
>
> 4. Once straw is pulled out, with the concrete grid still in place, what
can
> we possibly refill the walls with?. The moisture tends towards the outside
> of the walls, so we are hoping to keep the interior surfaces intact and
just
> work from the outside.When refilling the walls, we want to keep moisture
to
> a minimum, so straw clay or other poured or puddled materials seem
unlikely.
> I do not see how to use straw realistically- would that be possible? We
are
> going into winter here.
>
> 5. I have not had a chance to investigate any possible coverage from
> liability insurance the original contractor may have carried. Would we
> expect this to apply? The house is about 4-5 years old.
>
> I am sure that other questions will arise as we proceed. This a very
> beautiful home, with lovely interior finishes. One problem inside is that
> the clay floors are wearing poorly around furniture. They want it replaced
> with colored concrete. Any ideas on this?
>
> Look forward to a response. Anyone want to do some volunteer (or perhaps
> paid) work on forensic straw bale?
>
> Cheers
>
> Danny Buck
> Santa Fe, NM
>



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