[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

GSBN: Digest for 2/23/05



This message contains a digest of the messages posted to the list today. If
you reply to this message, please be sure to change the subject line to
something meaningful. Also, be careful not to include the entire text of this
message in your reply.


---------------------------------------------------------------------


-> compressed earth blocks
     by forum@...


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 23 Feb 2005 08:31:45 -0600
From: forum@...
Subject: compressed earth blocks

Hi all,

CRATerre is indead a good resource.

In their book that Catherine mentioned they suggest that lime can also be used
for stabilisation.  They explain that lime goes into some sort of chemical war
(my interpretation) with the clay particles.

Remember a GSBN discussion on using lime in earthen plaster?
Well, adding some lime to earth as a stabelizer might actually weaken the end
product if the amount of lime was insufficient to win the 'war'.

(I suspect cement acts in the same way)

An other Compressed Earth Blocks resource is Serge Ma#238#ni located in
Auroville,
India (where he is known as Satprem). He is part of CRATerre and has extensive
exp#233#rience with making and building with CEBs.
He also has made a (manual) CEB press that is extremely well made and that
allows to make an incredible range of very nifty CEB products.

Ciao,

Andr#233#
La Maison en Paille






Selon Bruce King ecobruce@...:

>
>
>
> Howdy -
>
> Many thanks to all of you who have responded regarding compressed earth
> blocks.  Is it just me,
> or is there a lot more happening in this area than, say, over the past
> ten years?
>
> I have many of the references y'all suggested, and have even read some.
>   There is clearly a whole
> library of good (and bad) material out there waiting to be absorbed.
>
> Here's another debate starter:  my understanding about compressed earth
> blocks so far is:
>
> 1)  Adding some cement
>         benefits:  faster set (= faster to be useable), higher strength
> and wear resistance
>                              dearer to Building Officials everywhere
>         detriments:  less ability to absorb indoor moisture, odors, and
> pollutants, cost of cement,
>                                hassle of 90 minute pot life before
> compressing the mixture
>                                not quite exactly biodegradable
>
> 2)  NOT adding any cement
>        pretty much the opposite of above
>
> Anyone want to comment on the above?  Also, please notice that I have
> copied
> this message to Tom Morton, a chartered Architect doing some
> outstanding research in Scotland
> (see www.arc-architects.co.uk ) with his wife and partner, Becky
> Little.  I am grateful to them for banging
> into my engineer skull (even more than many of you already have) that
> cement is not always such a great
> addition to earthen construction.
>
>
> >> Thanks!
> >>
> >> Bruce King, PE
> >> Director, Ecological Building Network
> >> 209 Caledonia St.
> >> Sausalito, CA 94965  USA
> >> (415) 331-7630
> >> fax 332-4072
> >> www.ecobuildnetwork.org
> >> bruce@ ecobuildnetwork.org
>
>
> --- This list does not allow attachments or HTML mail.  ---
> ---The notes below outline what was removed. ---
> multipart/alternative
>   text/plain (text body -- kept)
>   text/enriched
> ---
> ----
> GSBN is an invitation-only forum of key individuals and representatives of
> regional straw construction organizations. The costs of operating this list
> are underwritten by The Last Straw Journal in exchange for use of the GSBN
as
> an advisory board and technical editing arm.
>
> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list, send
> email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
> ----
>
>




----------------------------------------------------------------------

End of Digest

To request a copy of the help file, reply to this message and put "help" in
the subject.