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GSBN: Digest for 3/30/05



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-> Information Gathering
     by Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
-> FW: [Strawbale]part 2: Look Ma', no hands!
     by Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
-> FW: [Strawbale]SB in Wikipedia
     by Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
-> Strawlocator.com
     by Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
-> Re: holding down the roof (was: Look Ma', no hands!)
     by Derek Roff derek@...
-> Re: GSBN:Re: holding down the roof (was: Look Ma', no hands!)
     by Mark Piepkorn duckchow@...
-> Read this article from E Magazine!
     by Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...


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Date: 30 Mar 2005 08:55:06 -0600
From: Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
Subject: Information Gathering

Please share this email with others.

There is a growing interest and need to gather information about straw-bale
buildings around the world. We are interested in learning more about
business, commercial and industrial buildings, churches and schools, homes
and housing (such as elderly housing, ecovillages, cohousing, multi-family
housing), studios and workshops, all types of buildings and uses of
strawbale. People want to know what the growth rate in straw-bale
construction is over the past five years; where and what types of buildings
are being constructed; what methods are being used as well as design
features. They want to get in touch with people who are working on a similar
project in their area - say a commercial building is being planned and the
people putting the project together want to know if other people have done
the same type of building and what they can learn from them.

To accomplish this, we ask that you list your straw-bale building on the
International Straw Bale Registry. sustainablesources.com, The Last Straw Journal,
The Straw Bale Association of Texas, and the Development Center for
Appropriate Technology, along with a number of regional strawbale
organizations are working together to build a database of buildings
constructed using straw bales. The aggregate numbers will be useful in many
ways: future research and performance testing, educating insurance
companies, mortgage companies, realtors and real estate appraisers, building
officials. It will also be useful in further popularizing SB to the general
public worldwide. Reading in a magazine article that "over $xxx million in
straw-bale construction already exists in North America" can have a strong
effect on our credibility. The registry also serves as a source of
information and contacts for The Last Straw for articles, surveys, project
pages and other journal content. It's a very valuable tool for the
straw-bale community worldwide.

There are built-in safeguards to ensure privacy about your project, if you
desire. You can share as much or as little information as you want. You can
opt to list your project as available for public viewing, but you don't have
to.

Donations to support this project are welcome. The Last Straw's publisher,
The Green Prairie Foundation for Sustainability/GPFS, is a 501(c)(3) and can
accept tax deductible contributions. Please send donations to GPFS/TLS to:
International Straw Bale Registry Project, The Last Straw Journal, PO Box
22706, Lincoln, NE, 68542-2706 USA.

Joyce
- -------
Joyce Coppinger, Managing Editor
GPFS/TLS, PO Box 22706, Lincoln NE 68542-2706 USA
402.483.5135, fax 402.483.5161
thelaststraw@...
www.thelaststraw.org





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Date: 30 Mar 2005 09:11:01 -0600
From: Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
Subject: FW: [Strawbale]part 2: Look Ma', no hands!

Thought you might like to respond to Rikki, and if you do, please cc the
GSBN list. Thanks, Joyce.

- ----------
> From: "rikki nitzkin" rnitzkin@...
> Reply-To: strawbale@...
> Date: Wed, 30 Mar 2005 11:43:14 +0000
> To: strawbale@...
> Subject: [Strawbale]part 2: Look Ma', no hands!
> 
> I always thought that to build a solid, load-bearing SB house it was
> necessary to include a tie-down system and a roof-plate.
> 
> On a recent trip investigating SB houses in Spain, I found out that this is
> not true.
> 
> I saw eight SB structures with know tie-down system, five of which had no
> roof-plate, and all were perfectly solid.  The oldest of these houses is 4
> years old, and hasn't moved at all.  The biggest is two stories high (29m2
> per floor).
> 
> This two-story house was built using a unique technique: the man plastered
> each course of bales as it went up.  The first three courses could be laid
> and plastered at once, then about one course a day, so that the straw/clay
> plaster had time to set.  He built the whole house, alone, in less than two
> months.  The walls have not compressed at all.  The beams for the second
> story are placed over very small (2x2) strips of wood laid on top of the
> bales--no tie-down. The roof beams the same, just plastered all around with
> a heavy straw/clay plaster.  The roof is very light-weight.
> 
> This reminds me of Tom Rijven's system of bale-dipping, but one step
> farther.
> 
> Does anyone know of any other homes (load-bearing) built without tie-down
> systems or roof-plates?
> How have they held up?  If it really works (in these houses it seems to) it
> could save a lot of time and money in building . . .
> 
> 
> 
> ____________________________________________________
> European strawbale building discussion list
> 
> Send all messages to:
> Strawbale@...
> 
> Archives, subscription options, etc:
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://amper.ped.muni.cz/mailman/listinfo/strawbale";>http://amper.ped.muni.cz/mailman/listinfo/strawbale</a>
> ____________________________________________________
> 
> 



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 30 Mar 2005 09:59:31 -0600
From: Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
Subject: FW: [Strawbale]SB in Wikipedia

Would be interested in your comments and review of this site.

Joyce

- -------
Joyce Coppinger, Managing Editor
GPFS/TLS, PO Box 22706, Lincoln NE 68542-2706 USA
402.483.5135, fax 402.483.5161
thelaststraw@...
www.thelaststraw.org

- ----------
> From: "Stewart Hargrave" Stewart@...
> Reply-To: strawbale@...
> Date: Thu, 24 Mar 2005 21:42:48 -0000
> To: Strawbale@...
> Subject: [Strawbale]SB in Wikipedia
>
> Has anybody else been watching Wikipedia (<a  target="_blank" href="http://en.wikipedia.org";>http://en.wikipedia.org</a>) grow into
a
> useful resource over the past few years? I found it about a year ago, and
see
> it
> now has quite a large entry for strawbale building
> (<a  target="_blank" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straw-bale_construction";>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straw-bale_construction</a>).
>
> For those that don't know, Wikipedia is an encyclopedia that we make for
> ourselves. It is set up so that anyone can create an entry, or modify,
correct
> and
> expand what is already there. There are several language versions of it (the
> above links take you to the English version), and I'm guessing that several
> people here could add more to it, if they haven't already.
>
> --
> Stewart H.
>
> ____________________________________________________
> European strawbale building discussion list
>
> Send all messages to:
> Strawbale@...
>
> Archives, subscription options, etc:
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://amper.ped.muni.cz/mailman/listinfo/strawbale";>http://amper.ped.muni.cz/mailman/listinfo/strawbale</a>
> ____________________________________________________
>
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 30 Mar 2005 13:16:09 -0600
From: Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
Subject: Strawlocator.com

It's time to start lining up bales for your straw-bale project this
Spring/Summer. Just want to remind you that you can list the specifications
for and quantity of the bales you need for your project at
www.strawlocator.com.

This web site also has listings of bales that are available as well as
haulers and supplies.

And remember to tell the farmer who baled your straw for you or farmers in
your area about this web site and the fact that the they can list the bales
they have available, too.

Joyce
- -------
Joyce Coppinger, Managing Editor
GPFS/TLS, PO Box 22706, Lincoln NE 68542-2706 USA
402.483.5135, fax 402.483.5161
thelaststraw@...
www.thelaststraw.org



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 30 Mar 2005 13:30:13 -0600
From: Derek Roff derek@...
Subject: Re: holding down the roof (was: Look Ma', no hands!)

In some cases, a gale-force wind (>55 kph/34 mph) can apply more lift to 
the roof of a building than the combined downward forces of both live and 
dead loads for that same roof.  In other words, winds can put more force 
into trying to lift a roof off, than the weight of the roof and its 
heaviest snow load.  In these winds (especially when there is no live 
load), the roof will fly away, unless restrained by a tie-down system of 
some sort.

And there always is a tie-down system of some sort.  The question is 
whether the system is sufficient for the building design and local 
conditions.  When owner-builders start getting creative, and leaving out 
traditional building components and strategies, they vastly increase the 
risk of failure due to unexpected (by them) factors.  Gale force winds 
(less than half the velocity of hurricane force winds) occur fairly 
frequently in almost every location on earth.

Many owner-builders are unaware of this risk, and most people severely 
underestimate the magnitude of the wind forces on the roof.  Obviously, 
there are many variables in local conditions and building details. 
However, reliable roof attachment is always important.  Common construction 
techniques can provide the necessary attachment, while obscuring the 
function.  For example, most bale compression systems used by 
owner-builders also do a good job of holding down the roof.  However, the 
latter function is often ignored or underrated.

I am curious about the roof attachment for the buildings described in 
Rikki's message.  It may be that there is some roof tie-down system that is 
not obvious.  Or perhaps the buildings are at risk.  Earthen plaster by 
itself is not sufficient for holding the roof down.

Derek

(PS- Please forward my comments to the European Strawbale list.  Since I am 
not a member, I doubt that my posting will go through.)

Derek Roff
Language Learning Center
Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
Internet: derek@...

> From: "rikki nitzkin" rnitzkin@...
> Reply-To: strawbale@...
> Date: Wed, 30 Mar 2005 11:43:14 +0000
> To: strawbale@...
> Subject: [Strawbale]part 2: Look Ma', no hands!
>
> I always thought that to build a solid, load-bearing SB house it was
> necessary to include a tie-down system and a roof-plate.
>
> On a recent trip investigating SB houses in Spain, I found out that this 
is
> not true.
>
> I saw eight SB structures with know tie-down system, five of which had no
> roof-plate, and all were perfectly solid.  The oldest of these houses is 4
> years old, and hasn't moved at all.  The biggest is two stories high (29m2
> per floor).
>
> This two-story house was built using a unique technique: the man plastered
> each course of bales as it went up.  The first three courses could be laid
> and plastered at once, then about one course a day, so that the straw/clay
> plaster had time to set.  He built the whole house, alone, in less than 
two
> months.  The walls have not compressed at all.  The beams for the second
> story are placed over very small (2x2) strips of wood laid on top of the
> bales--no tie-down. The roof beams the same, just plastered all around 
with
> a heavy straw/clay plaster.  The roof is very light-weight.
>
> This reminds me of Tom Rijven's system of bale-dipping, but one step
> farther.
>
> Does anyone know of any other homes (load-bearing) built without tie-down
> systems or roof-plates?
> How have they held up?  If it really works (in these houses it seems to) 
it
> could save a lot of time and money in building . . .
>
> ____________________________________________________
> European strawbale building discussion list



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 30 Mar 2005 14:29:35 -0600
From: Mark Piepkorn duckchow@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: holding down the roof (was: Look Ma', no hands!)

Back in Lars Keller's longhair days, a bunch of Euros and a couple Aussies
came to cowboy country. I think it had something to do with Judy and Matts.
This wild bunch raced up and down the western U.S.A., perplexing the
'Murricans with their excellent insights and clever questions. I tagged
along indiscreetly in a red Metro.
<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.potkettleblack.com/natbild/strawbaliens.html";>http://www.potkettleblack.com/natbild/strawbaliens.html</a>

I seem to recall a tale told by the self-builders at Songdog Ranch - they
built their big SB house in 1987 - about sitting inside during a big
windstorm and watching a corner of the roof lift up enough to alarm the
Harley-riding Californians, then settle back down... in mostly the right
place.

Probably there was somebody there who was a better memory than me, like
Rhine-mouth Rene, with a better recollection of the details.


Mark Piepkorn


At 02:03 PM 3/30/2005, Derek Roff wrote:
>In some cases, a gale-force wind (>55 kph/34 mph) can apply more lift to
>the roof of a building than the combined downward forces of both live and
>dead loads for that same roof...


>>From: "rikki nitzkin" rnitzkin@...
>>
>>I always thought that to build a solid, load-bearing SB house it was
>>necessary to include a tie-down system and a roof-plate.



Mark Piepkorn
<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.potkettleblack.com";>http://www.potkettleblack.com</a>

~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~

You may drive out Nature with a
pitchfork, yet she will always hurry
back.
                                  - Horace




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 30 Mar 2005 15:29:45 -0600
From: Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
Subject: Read this article from E Magazine!

Click this link, or copy and paste it into your browser, to read a great
article from E/The Environmental Magazine:
<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.emagazine.com/view?2315";>http://www.emagazine.com/view?2315</a> .  This is not a spam or automatic
e-mail; a friend has sent you this link.

Thought you might enjoy reading this article if you haven't already.

Joyce
- -------
Joyce Coppinger, Managing Editor
GPFS/TLS, PO Box 22706, Lincoln NE 68542-2706 USA
402.483.5135, fax 402.483.5161
thelaststraw@...
www.thelaststraw.org



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