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GSBN: Digest for 8/31/06



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-> Ugandan building project
     by Ben bobregon@...
-> RE: GSBN:Re: pre-compression
     by "Brian Hodge - Anvill" brian@...
-> RE: GSBN:A long time
     by "David A Bainbridge" bainbrid@...
-> RE: pre-compression
     by Derek Roff derek@...


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Date: 31 Aug 2006 15:18:19 -0700
From: Ben bobregon@...
Subject: Ugandan building project

Hi All

I have been asked to work on an orphanage in Central Uganda and am
looking for any contacts on this list that are located (or do work) in
the region.

Briefly, a contractor I recently worked with told me his daughter and
her husband work with Ugandan orphans. They have already procured a 100
acres tract upon which to put the buildings. There is the possibility of
an additional 300 acres of land being provided. Their current program is
to build as self sustaining of a community as possible. As he (the
contractor) explained, their hope is to purchase a block forming machine
and produce the walls from local soils (perhaps w/ some sort of
stabilizer added). They can fabricate roof trusses from local materials
and will roof w/ corrugated metal. They have 2 existing wells on site
and are working to have a small herd of cattle donated or purchased.
They hope to create methane gas to use for energy.

The people behind this appear (so far) to be dedicated and motivated.
They have a non profit 501 c-3 in place and the person who has contacted
me is a retired General Contractor who has previously experience
building from local materials in less developed countries.

Any thought, comments or interest will be greatly appreciated.

Take Care

Ben Obregon Architect
Austin, TX USA



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Date: 31 Aug 2006 16:49:02 -0700
From: "Brian Hodge - Anvill" brian@...
Subject: RE: GSBN:Re: pre-compression

Hi Derek,
The crease that the strapping company is referring to is not only the
crease at the buckle, but at any point along the length of the strapping
such as where it runs over timber. If the retensioning is done on both
sides it is likely that the crease will remain in the same position
across the timber, however, given that we deal only with owner builders,
I am concerned as to their capacity to reliably achieve this.
Consequently, the shift to polyester which does not have this concern.

- -----Original Message-----
From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] On Behalf Of Derek Roff
Sent: Thursday, 24 August 2006 11:28 PM
To: GSBN
Subject: GSBN:Re: pre-compression


> The manufacturers of the plastic strapping advised
> me that it cannot be tensioned more than once, as the crease created
> by the initial tensioning will be a point of failure.

Strapping systems vary.  On the ones that I have used, after
re-tensioning, the crease from the initial tensioning is no longer
within the tensioned section of the strap.  It is hanging loose,
unloaded, and flapping in the breeze.  Therefore, it won't be a point of
failure.  I can imagine that it might be, if I were progressively
loosening the straps, rather than tightening them.

Derelict

Derek Roff
Language Learning Center
Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
Internet: derek@...

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For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list,
send email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.

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Date: 31 Aug 2006 16:50:59 -0700
From: "David A Bainbridge" bainbrid@...
Subject: RE: GSBN:A long time

David, Derek et al

How long it might be sequestered in a straw bale building is a good
question... Well built buildings may have a very long life as we see
when we go to Europe.

I tracked down one timber frame in the UK with bundled barley straw
infill that was about 400 years old. The straw had just been removed in
a yuppification remodel - but had been mostly in very good shape.

One of the best ways to reduce energy and resource impacts is to
increase service life. Good details, durable materials and quality work.
Countries where you can get a 100 year mortgage encourage careful
building.

Cheers



David A. Bainbridge
Associate Professor, Sustainable Management
Marshall Goldsmith School of Management
Business &amp; Management Division
Alliant International University
10455 Pomerado Road
San Diego, CA 92131
(858) 635-4616
(858) 635 4528 fax
 WEB: marshallgoldsmith.alliant.edu

- -----Original Message-----
From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] On Behalf Of
strawnet@...
Sent: Tuesday, August 29, 2006 9:39 AM
To: GSBN@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:A question about quantification of carbon
sequestration in a bale and bale structures

 Thanks Derek,

 I agree with your observations in general, although I think that the
delay of on average probably five decades or more of that release of
many tons of atmospheric carbon for each sb house is part of the
contribution of sb construction to dealing with global warming that
shouldn't be ignored. All the straw that isn't burned but instead is
stored in the walls of buildings for decades is an offset at a time we
are wrestling with ways to reverse the trend.

 In a way this reminds me of the argument I've heard that embodied
energy in a building is dwarfed by the operating energy and so is
insignificant and can be ignored. I think that the embodied energy is
typically quite significant by itself, meaning that operating energy is
enormously significant...in other words, I agree that the ratio is
important and we need to focus our actions where we get the most
effective results, but that doesn't justify ignoring significant impacts
because they are smaller relative to other impacts, or in this case I
think, not claiming a benefit that comes along as part of what we're
already doing. It is just one more benefit, not the primary one, in my
view.

 Kelly's info from the study of Chinese straw bale houses versus their
brick counterparts, and any credible research and evidence showing the
energy use reduction potential of sb are a valuable contributions to the
overall benefits of sb construction.

 David

 -----Original Message-----
 From: derek@...
 To: GSBN@...
 Sent: Tue, 29 Aug 2006 7:26 AM
 Subject: Re: GSBN:A question about quantification of carbon
sequestration in a bale and bale structures

  My memory of the carbon sequestration analysis on the Chinese and
Mongolian
 strawbale structures, is that energy conservation dwarfs the impact of
the
 carbon stored in the straw. The few tons of carbon in the bales
themselves
 are part of the current carbon cycle, where plants grow and take in
carbon
 from the air, then die and release the carbon as they decompose. This
 cycle causes no net change in the atmospheric carbon levels.

 While the bales in a house might delay the straw's decomposition by a
few
 decades, I don't think that we can expect, on average, to lock up much
 atmospheric carbon in strawbale houses for very long.

 In contrast, every bit of fossil fuel burned brings carbon into the
 atmosphere that was sequestered millions of years ago. Fossil fuel use
has
 caused the dramatic increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide, over the
last
 century. The biggest impact of a strawbale home will be energy
 conservation, leading to decreased use of fossil fuels. This will vary
 with the climate and the success of the design and construction.
 Decreasing fossil fuel use, over the life of a strawbale home, is
likely to
 involve vastly more carbon that that which is in the bales. And all the
 carbon "saved" will be fossil carbon, which would otherwise have
directly
 increased the amount of carbon in the atmosphere.

 I think that carbon sequestration is one of the weaker claims for
strawbale
 building. On the other hand, energy conservation is variable with
climate
 and structure, making general numbers impossible. Quantifying either of
 these things isn't easy.

 Derek

 --On August 28, 2006 9:44:09 PM -0400 strawnet@...:

 > Hi all,
 >
 > A friend who we've been working with who is involved with Native
 > American renewable energy projects and also affordable
energy-efficient
 > housing for Native Americans just inquired about carbon sequestration
in
 > bales and bale structures. I know that there has been research done
on
 > this and that some folks have done work related to getting carbon
trading
 > credits for bale structures but after hunting around a bit here I
can't
 > seem to lay my hands on that info and wondered if anyone on the list
has
 > credible data and sources of information about that?
 >
 > Thanks for any help any of you might be able to provide.
 >
 > Warmest regards,
 >
 > David Eisenberg


 Derek Roff
 Language Learning Center
 Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
 University of New Mexico
 Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
 505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
 Internet: derek@...

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 For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list,
send email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
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Date: 31 Aug 2006 18:15:50 -0700
From: Derek Roff derek@...
Subject: RE: pre-compression

I appreciate your clarification, Brian.  I would recommend that no
strapping or cable make a 90 degree bend around a sharp corner of a timber,
or anything else.  Corners should be eased under the strapping before
tensioning, so that the strap or cable follows a more gentle radius.  The
needed radius varies with the material, but I would think a minimum radius
might be 25mm (1").

I believe that polyester _will_ have the same concern, as will steel.
Details of the specific material and configuration matter, but every
material is subject to issues of point loading and deformation.  Perhaps
for polyester, it is less of a problem than for polyethylene, although I'd
like to see the testing to support that assertion.  In general, stretchy
things do better on this kind of cycling that harder, stiffer things, like
polyester.

Derelict

Derek Roff

- --On Friday, September 1, 2006 7:23 AM +1000 Brian Hodge - Anvill
brian@... wrote:

> Hi Derek,
> The crease that the strapping company is referring to is not only the
> crease at the buckle, but at any point along the length of the strapping
> such as where it runs over timber. If the retensioning is done on both
> sides it is likely that the crease will remain in the same position
> across the timber, however, given that we deal only with owner builders,
> I am concerned as to their capacity to reliably achieve this.
> Consequently, the shift to polyester which does not have this concern.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] On Behalf Of Derek Roff
> Sent: Thursday, 24 August 2006 11:28 PM
> To: GSBN
> Subject: GSBN:Re: pre-compression
>
>
>> The manufacturers of the plastic strapping advised
>> me that it cannot be tensioned more than once, as the crease created
>> by the initial tensioning will be a point of failure.
>
> Strapping systems vary.  On the ones that I have used, after
> re-tensioning, the crease from the initial tensioning is no longer
> within the tensioned section of the strap.  It is hanging loose,
> unloaded, and flapping in the breeze.  Therefore, it won't be a point of
> failure.  I can imagine that it might be, if I were progressively
> loosening the straps, rather than tightening them.
>
> Derelict
>
> Derek Roff
> Language Learning Center
> Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
> University of New Mexico
> Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
> 505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
> Internet: derek@...
>
> ----
> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list,
> send email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
>
> ----
>
>
>
>

>



Derek Roff
Language Learning Center
Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
Internet: derek@...



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End of Digest

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