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GSBN: Digest for 7/4/07



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-> Re: GSBN:Cemento (combined responses)
     by Graeme North ecodesign@...
-> Re: GSBN:Snow loads and load bearing. Is it a lost cause ?!!!
     by "=?windows-1252?Q?Andr=E9_de_Bouter?=" forum@...
-> Re: GSBN:Cemento (% of total C02 emissions)
     by Mark Piepkorn mark@...
-> An inquiry from France...
     by David Eisenberg strawnet@...
-> Re: GSBN:Cemento (% of total C02 emissions)
     by Graeme North ecodesign@...
-> Re: Werner Schmidt
     by Catherine Wanek cat@...
-> Re: Cemento (% of total C02 emissions)
     by Derek Roff derek@...


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Date: 4 Jul 2007 00:25:51 -0500
From: Graeme North ecodesign@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Cemento (combined responses)

Thanks Mark - 

It looks as though the 6-10% figure so often quoted in green architecture
circles for cement manufacturing1s CO2 contribution may be partially right-
and wrong.

But see a graph at 

<a  target="_blank" href="http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/trends/emis/glo.htm";>http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/trends/emis/glo.htm</a>

This was in one of the references Mark so kindly put out.  It puts cement
manufacturing contribution at somewhere around  2-3 %  annual global CO2
emissions 

So although cement is one of the major players in the world1s pollution, and
certainly in the construction industry1s contribution, it looks to me that
although its present contribution may now be nearer 2-3 % of overall annual
global CO2 emissions, its cumulative total effect of all human generated CO2
appears to be nearer 8% -  does this look right to anybody else?


Graeme,
Graeme North Architects,
49 Matthew Road,
RD1, Warkworth,
New Zealand 0981
Ph/fax +64 (0)9  4259305

www.ecodesign.co.nz





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Date: 4 Jul 2007 03:50:31 -0500
From: "=?windows-1252?Q?Andr=E9_de_Bouter?=" forum@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Snow loads and load bearing. Is it a lost cause ?!!!

Hello Lars,

I'm not strong in calculations so I cannot respond to your demand know
if you are wrong.

How mini are your mini bigbales?

What I want to suggest is that you contact Werner Schmidt in
Switzerland. Ren#233# Dallmeijer put me in contact with him yesterday for my
article on lb sb and I had a look at his website (quite impressive). One
of the pictures I saw is of testing compression strength of a Jumbo bale
and an other of a loadbearing jumbo bale house with lots of snow on
top.  <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.atelierwernerschmidt.ch/realisiert.html";>http://www.atelierwernerschmidt.ch/realisiert.html</a> I don't know if
his are big bigbales.

In his email he sayd:
...This year we are building 3 Strawbale houses. All buildings are
constructed with Jumbobales, two of them are loadbearing construction
and one of them is a loadbearig three story house...


That makes me wonder. Is Werner Schmidt part of the GSBN? I think he
should be.

Bye,

Andr#233# (how come that apple fell on my head?) de Bouter
France




Lars Keller a #233#crit :
> Dear GSBN'ers
>
> In Norway a permit was recently given a go-ahead to a 50 building
> strong eco-village. By far the grandest ever in Norway.
>
> It has this far been our plan to build the very first of the houses
> using mini bigbales in a loadbearing construction.
>
> BUT n and this is the reason I write to you: when the other day we sat
> down and looked very carefully at Bruce Kings data in his amazing book
> "Design of Straw Bale Buildings", it appears to us that we discovered,
> that loadbearing, clayplastered, onestory buildings are NOT an option
> in Norway.
>
> Given that:
> the snowload varies from 2.5 kN/m2 to 8 kN/m2
> adding up the snow load, including dynamic load, the roof itself, and
> a build in loft, this adds up to 43 kN/m2 on the loadbearing straw
> bale wall.
> Basing the calculation on a hybrid construction we get 24,5 kN/m2
> straw bale wall.
>
> According to Bruce's book these figures are WAY beyond the limit.
>
> Can anyone please tell me that we're wrong ?
>
> Best regards
> Lars Keller
>


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Date: 4 Jul 2007 08:22:40 -0500
From: Mark Piepkorn mark@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Cemento (% of total C02 emissions)

At 11:26 PM 7/3/2007, Graeme North wrote:
>It looks as though the 6-10% figure so often 
>quoted in green architecture circles for cement 
>manufacturing1s CO2 contribution may be partially right- and wrong.
>
>But see a graph at
>
><a  target="_blank" href="http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/trends/emis/glo.htm";>http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/trends/emis/glo.htm</a>
>
>... It puts cement manufacturing contribution at 
>somewhere around  2-3 %  annual global CO2 emissions

         I wonder what the source of that 6-10% figure is.

         The underlying ORNL data - follow the "Digital Data" link to
<a  target="_blank" href="http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/ftp/ndp030/global.1751_2004.ems";>http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/ftp/ndp030/global.1751_2004.ems</a>
- - gives 7910 total and 298 for cement in 2004 
(the most recent year shown), or about 3.75%. But 
there's an interesting pattern in the data over 
time. C02 emissions from cement production not 
only keep increasing, they're a bigger and bigger cut of all C02 emissions.

Yr      % of ttl
'04     3.75
'03     3.68
'02     3.52
'01     3.33
'00     3.24
'99     3.19
'98     3.08
'97     3.06
'96     3.05
'95     3.02

'90     2.53

'85     2.40

'80     2.24

'75     2.06

'70     1.91

'65     1.88

'60     1.67



Mark Piepkorn
www.potkettleblack.com

Do not look back in anger, or forward in fear, but
around in awareness.
   - James Thurber



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Date: 4 Jul 2007 14:33:00 -0500
From: David Eisenberg strawnet@...
Subject: An inquiry from France...

Hello all,

Here is an inquiry from a French architect that came to DCAT. I wrote back
with contact info for Andre and Martin and ESBN as well as TLS and EBnet, but
I'm hoping that some of you might contact her directly to offer more
regionally appropriate information than I can provide from here (BTW, it's
going to be 111 degrees F in Tucson today).

Best,

David Eisenberg





From: "DCAT"=C2=A0



Date: July 4, 2007 9:43:22 AM MST



Subject: DCAT.net Form







 

Email: armor09@...



Questions: hello,



I am an architect working in France and I am
more and more interesting in building houses in straw bales. As France
is not as far as your country in such a field, I am asking you about
your research concerning this material, in aspect of warmth, of
moisture, of condition of storage, if you have information about
clading surfaces outdoor and indoor, etc and etc



Can you inform me?



I would be glad to get news from you.



Sincerely



V=C3=A9ronique Samson

 

________________________________________________________________________
AOL now offers free email to everyone.  Find out more about what's free from
AOL at AOL.com.


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Date: 4 Jul 2007 19:06:33 -0500
From: Graeme North ecodesign@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Cemento (% of total C02 emissions)

Thanks very much Mark

I suspect that the source of the 6-10% may partially be speculation that has
travelled by Chinese whispers, but it is included in the
the 1993 paper recently posted which says:
 
CO2 Emissions
 
There are two very different sources of carbon
dioxide emissions during cement production.
Combustion of fossil fuels to operate the rotary
kiln is the largest source: approximately 3/4
tons of CO2 per ton of cement. But the chemical
process of calcining limestone into lime in the cement kiln also produces
CO2:
 
CaCO 3 i CaO + CO 2 limestone i lime + carbon dioxide
 
This chemical process is responsible for roughly
1/2 ton of CO2 per ton of cement, according to
researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
Combining these two sources, for every ton of
cement produced, 1.25 tons of CO2 is released
into the atmosphere. In the United States, cement
production accounts for approximately 100 million
tons of CO 2 emissions, or just under 2% of our
total human-generated CO 2. Worldwide, cement
production now accounts for more than 1.6 billion
tons of CO2 - over 8% of total CO2 emissions from all human activities.

The graph at   <a  target="_blank" href="http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/trends/emis/glo.htm";>http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/trends/emis/glo.htm</a>
shows an increasing contribution from cement manufacturing but a lesser % of
the overall CO2 output.
Your figures show the opposite - as you say -  C02 emissions from cement
production not 
only keep increasing, they're a bigger and bigger cut of all C02 emissions.

This latest data seems pretty conclusive -
<a  target="_blank" href="http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/ftp/ndp030/global.1751_2004.ems";>http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/ftp/ndp030/global.1751_2004.ems</a>
- - gives 7910 total and 298 for cement in 2004
(the most recent year shown), or about 3.75%.

The 1993 figure from this data is around 2.8% compared to the figure quoted
above of just under 2% so there is some discrepancy it seems  - I assume
that the latest data is more accurate

So a figure of 3.5- 4% for cement1s global CO2 contribution seems pretty
realistic to me.

In a way this is of only idle curiosity for me, but the cement manufacturers
are now doing a big push to say how environmentally good their material is,
so its good to have some background data.

And here1s an interesting one - a local council official here would not let
a neighbour use limestone as a subdivision road base - he said that some
figures they had from our weather scientists meant that the acidity in the
atmosphere was expected to increase to such an extent that acid rain
(containing weak carbonic acid) would dissolve the limestone and destroy the
road - 
I have heard that the oceans acidity will increase enough from absorbed
increased atmospheric CO2 over the next 50 years to dissolve the shells of
shell fish and coral - I1ve not heard of the projection about rain before.

Now if true, where does this leave our huge concrete-based buildings and
infrastructure?


Graeme,
Graeme North Architects,
49 Matthew Road,
RD1, Warkworth,
New Zealand 0981
Ph/fax +64 (0)9  4259305

www.ecodesign.co.nz


 
 

 





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Date: 4 Jul 2007 21:45:06 -0500
From: Catherine Wanek cat@...
Subject: Re: Werner Schmidt

At 02:46 AM 7/4/2007,  Andre wrote:
>Is Werner Schmidt part of the GSBN? I think he
>should be.

I second Andre's nomination of architect  Werner Schmidt of
Switzerland, where the GSBN is not yet represented.

Like Rene, I am a big fan of Werner's work -- he has created a
variety of very interesting and energy efficient strawbale buildings
in Switzerland and Italy, using load-bearing jumbo bales for
structure, as well as bales insulating in the ceilings and floors.

Here is his email and website:  "Werner Schmidt" atelier_schmidt@...

<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.atelierwernerschmidt.ch/";>http://www.atelierwernerschmidt.ch/</a>

- -Catherine


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Date: 4 Jul 2007 21:45:15 -0500
From: Derek Roff derek@...
Subject: Re: Cemento (% of total C02 emissions)

When we last had this discussion on GSBN, list members quoted several 
sources, which reported one ton of CO2 released per ton of cement.  It is 
interesting to me that the Oak Ridge number is 25% higher than the figures 
that we found a few years ago.

At that time, no one was able to come up with any kind of average, best 
case or worst case numbers on the amount of CO2 released in other parts of 
cement use.  The limestone must be mined, crushed, transported to the 
kilns, burned, ground, packaged, transported to the vendor, transported to 
the job site, installed and finished.  I wish I had some idea of how much 
CO2 is released in these activities.   There are many variables, but 
analyzing one average case would be informative.  Would these factors 
together double the carbon impact of using Portland cement, compared to the 
calcining kiln process by itself?  Or are these other steps in the process 
much less significant than the kiln process?   If anyone has any insights 
or figures, I would love to hear about them.

Derek

Derek Roff
Language Learning Center
Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
Internet: derek@...

- --On Thursday, July 5, 2007 10:45 AM +1200 Graeme North 
ecodesign@... wrote:

> Combustion of fossil fuels to operate the rotary
> kiln is the largest source: approximately 3/4
> tons of CO2 per ton of cement. But the chemical
> process of calcining limestone into lime in the cement kiln also produces
> CO2:
>
> CaCO 3 i CaO + CO 2 limestone i lime + carbon dioxide
>
> This chemical process is responsible for roughly
> 1/2 ton of CO2 per ton of cement, according to
> researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
> Combining these two sources, for every ton of
> cement produced, 1.25 tons of CO2 is released
> into the atmosphere.



Derek Roff
Language Learning Center
Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
Internet: derek@...



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