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GSBN: Digest for 10/4/07



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-> Any SB contacts in Chile?
     by "Chug" chug@...
-> Re: GSBN:Any SB contacts in Chile?
     by billc billc_lists@...
-> Re: Strawbale walling query
     by Tom Woolley woolley.tom@...
-> Re: GSBN:Any SB contacts in Chile?
     by BuildersWithoutBorders mail@...
-> Re: GSBN:Re: Strawbale walling query
     by caroline meyer white fredmeyer8@...
-> Re: GSBN:Re: Strawbale walling query
     by billc billc_lists@...
-> Re: GSBN:Re: Strawbale walling query
     by Laura Bartels laura@...
-> Re: GSBN:Re: Strawbale walling query
     by cmagwood@...


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Date: 4 Oct 2007 01:14:33 -0500
From: "Chug" chug@...
Subject: Any SB contacts in Chile?

Greetings baleheads,

I had a guy from Chile (currently residing in England but returning home
next spring) on my last SB course and he asked me if I knew of any SB
contacts in Chile, I'm sure there are as I'm sure I had some on my
international contacts list which I lost during a system failure last boxing
day, so any info you good folk can provide would be appreciated.

Also does anyone have any info on the connection between sustainable
building-cob, strawbale, natural materials etc- and the psychological
benefits of living/working in such a place.
Do you know of any research, case studies, books, people, anything that
might be useful?

Bale on!
warm regards
Chug
chug@...
<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.strawbale-building.co.uk/";>http://www.strawbale-building.co.uk/</a>
.




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Date: 4 Oct 2007 02:00:15 -0500
From: billc billc_lists@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Any SB contacts in Chile?

At 7:07 AM +0100 10/4/07, Chug wrote:
>Greetings baleheads,
>
>I had a guy from Chile (currently residing in England but returning home
>next spring) on my last SB course and he asked me if I knew of any SB
>contacts in Chile, I'm sure there are as I'm sure I had some on my
>international contacts list which I lost during a system failure last boxing
>day, so any info you good folk can provide would be appreciated.

There's one in Santiago in the SB Registry, and one entry that looks
a bit questionable.

There was also a guy named Dane Judd who was on SB-R-Us for quite a
while.  I haven't heard from him in a year or more.  Last known email
address was delta6@...

Searching for that in my SB archives also pulled up this one from Chris Green:

- ---

Here is one site: Architecture en fardos, from Chile, means
"architecture with bales."
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.arquitecturaenfardos.cl/index2.html";>http://www.arquitecturaenfardos.cl/index2.html</a>><a  target="_blank" href="http://www.arquitecturaenfardos.cl/index2.html";>http://www.arquitecturaenfardos.cl/index2.html</a>
The contact at this site is Jorge Broughten Wainer, and his contact info
is listed if you click on "Contacto"

I don't read much Spanish (yet) but it appears Jorge, an architect, has
been designing and building SB in Chile for some time: 10 anos.
The above page is a Flash presentation and the text therefore doesn't
get translated by Babelfish.
His blog, also in Spanish:
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.arquitecturaenfardos.blogspot.com/";>http://www.arquitecturaenfardos.blogspot.com/</a>><a  target="_blank" href="http://www.arquitecturaenfardos.blogspot.com/";>http://www.arquitecturaenfardos.blogspot.com/</a>

- ---

- --
Bill Christensen
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://sustainablesources.com/contact/";>http://sustainablesources.com/contact/</a>>

Don't miss October's Natural Building Colloquium:
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://naturalbuildingtexas.org";>http://naturalbuildingtexas.org</a>>

Green Building Professionals Directory: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://directory.sustainablesources.com";>http://directory.sustainablesources.com</a>>
Sustainable Building Calendar: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/";>http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/</a>>
Green Real Estate: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/";>http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/</a>>
Straw Bale Registry: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/";>http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/</a>>
Books/videos/software: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/";>http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/</a>>


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Date: 4 Oct 2007 12:17:45 -0500
From: Tom Woolley woolley.tom@...
Subject: Re: Strawbale walling query


I had a meeting today with a young Belfast architect, Siobhan Brown,
who is designing a strawbale house for a self builder in County
Fermanagh ~Northern Ireland

I don't think Siobhan has much experience of SB but she has had a
good go at the design mainly based on details in a book by Chris Magwood

The client wants to built a post and beam structure for the house and
then wrap the strawbale walls around the outside of the posts.
She was not proposing to tie the walls into the posts as she says
that Magwood's details do not show this.
She was planing to tie the wall plate to the rafters of the roof. The
house is single storey but with rooms in the loft. so the floor
joists for the upper floor will be part of the roof structure.

I have misgivings about this . I wonder if anyone has built a
strawbale house where the bale walls are not load bearing and are
wrapped around the outside of the structural posts without being tied
into them? The posts will be about 4 metres apart.

Fermanagh has to have 100% humidity all year round with a lot of
heavy winds and driving rain. If you stand still for 5 minutes moss
will grow on your head.  I also think the walls will need a rain screen

I would have thought a more solid structure would involve placing
sections of bale walls between the posts and being tied into them

Any useful comments and I will pass them onto Siobhan

thanks


Tom Woolley
woolley.tom@...
Rachel Bevan Architects
17A Main Street
Saintfield
Ballynahinch
County Down
BT24 7AA
028 97 512851

also:
Graduate School of the Environment
Centre for Alternative Technology
Unit 7, Dyfi Eco Parc
Machynlleth
Powys, SY208AX

01654 703562






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Date: 4 Oct 2007 12:58:19 -0500
From: BuildersWithoutBorders mail@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Any SB contacts in Chile?

Hello Chug --

Yes, we have an American friend of excellent character and many
skills, who has been living in the Santiago region for twenty years
or so.  He came up to the US in 2003 &amp; 2004, and perhaps more
recently too, to learn and build with strawbale and other natural
materials.   Contact: Eric Hempstead huincafilms@...

Also, I remember a TLS article from a few years ago about strawbale
in Chile -- Joyce, is that info at your fingertips?

best regards,
Catherine Wanek
PS -- I would also be interested in any studies that may exist about
the human health benefits of natural building.

At 12:07 AM 10/4/2007, Chug wrote:
>Greetings baleheads,
>
>I had a guy from Chile (currently residing in England but returning home
>next spring) on my last SB course and he asked me if I knew of any SB
>contacts in Chile....  Bale on!
>warm regards Chug
>chug@...
><a  target="_blank" href="http://www.strawbale-building.co.uk/";>http://www.strawbale-building.co.uk/</a>


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Date: 4 Oct 2007 12:58:28 -0500
From: caroline meyer white fredmeyer8@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Strawbale walling query

Hi Tom,

  A comment from Denmark is that here, if people do a post and beam structure,
it is strongly advised by all, that they do not have the bales between the
posts, if they are of roundtimber. I couldn't see if that was the case here.
But in other words, yes, there are several exsamples of houses where the walls
are standing apart from the posts. Never the less, I have had very good
experience at one house where, the bales were put at approximately 2 " from
the posts, and a iron rod was put through the bale and into the post, to
control the wall, but still have space behind the post, so that the plaster
can go without any interference.
  Ofcourse eaves of 1 m - 2 meters all the way around the house would be
great. Here a lot of people consequently put a wooden paneling on the south
and western side of the house, to not have to face to much maintainence on
those to hardest hit directions. Otherwise there are a lot of good exsamples
of limeplaster for those to sides. DK probably has a mild kind of Irland
climate.

  Yours Caroline

Tom Woolley woolley.tom@... wrote:

I had a meeting today with a young Belfast architect, Siobhan Brown,
who is designing a strawbale house for a self builder in County
Fermanagh ~Northern Ireland

I don't think Siobhan has much experience of SB but she has had a
good go at the design mainly based on details in a book by Chris Magwood

The client wants to built a post and beam structure for the house and
then wrap the strawbale walls around the outside of the posts.
She was not proposing to tie the walls into the posts as she says
that Magwood's details do not show this.
She was planing to tie the wall plate to the rafters of the roof. The
house is single storey but with rooms in the loft. so the floor
joists for the upper floor will be part of the roof structure.

I have misgivings about this . I wonder if anyone has built a
strawbale house where the bale walls are not load bearing and are
wrapped around the outside of the structural posts without being tied
into them? The posts will be about 4 metres apart.

Fermanagh has to have 100% humidity all year round with a lot of
heavy winds and driving rain. If you stand still for 5 minutes moss
will grow on your head. I also think the walls will need a rain screen

I would have thought a more solid structure would involve placing
sections of bale walls between the posts and being tied into them

Any useful comments and I will pass them onto Siobhan

thanks


Tom Woolley
woolley.tom@...
Rachel Bevan Architects
17A Main Street
Saintfield
Ballynahinch
County Down
BT24 7AA
028 97 512851

also:
Graduate School of the Environment
Centre for Alternative Technology
Unit 7, Dyfi Eco Parc
Machynlleth
Powys, SY208AX

01654 703562






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Date: 4 Oct 2007 13:41:31 -0500
From: billc billc_lists@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Strawbale walling query

At 6:06 PM +0100 10/4/07, Tom Woolley wrote:
>I had a meeting today with a young Belfast architect, Siobhan Brown,
>who is designing a strawbale house for a self builder in County
>Fermanagh ~Northern Ireland
>
>I don't think Siobhan has much experience of SB but she has had a
>good go at the design mainly based on details in a book by Chris Magwood
>
>The client wants to built a post and beam structure for the house and
>then wrap the strawbale walls around the outside of the posts.
>She was not proposing to tie the walls into the posts as she says
>that Magwood's details do not show this.
>She was planing to tie the wall plate to the rafters of the roof. The
>house is single storey but with rooms in the loft. so the floor
>joists for the upper floor will be part of the roof structure.
>
>I have misgivings about this . I wonder if anyone has built a
>strawbale house where the bale walls are not load bearing and are
>wrapped around the outside of the structural posts without being tied
>into them? The posts will be about 4 metres apart.
>
>Fermanagh has to have 100% humidity all year round with a lot of
>heavy winds and driving rain. If you stand still for 5 minutes moss
>will grow on your head.  I also think the walls will need a rain screen
>
>I would have thought a more solid structure would involve placing
>sections of bale walls between the posts and being tied into them
>
>Any useful comments and I will pass them onto Siobhan

Hi Tom,

We're thinking about doing a similar thing - essentially a timber
frame with a SB wrap.  We plan wide porches instead of a rainscreen.

Part of my reason for wanting to do this is to minimize the notching
and customizing of bales to accomodate a frame, and part is to
minimize the joints between the dissimilar materials of frame and
bales, where moisture and other problems could creep in.

One thing that I don't like about some interior-post buildings I've
seen is that you end up with spaces behind the posts which are hard
to plaster properly, hard to keep clean, etc.

Some time back, possibly on this list, I read of a method that makes
sense to me. On the bale side of the post, you nail strips of ply or
OSB which extend out some distance on either side (I think it was
something like 6-12 inches).  Snug the bales up to that, then put
lath over the wood and extending out over the bale face to create a
continuous surface for the plaster.   Supposedly this allows for a
good seal and reduced chance of cracking at the joint.


- --
Bill Christensen
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://sustainablesources.com/contact/";>http://sustainablesources.com/contact/</a>>

Don't miss October's Natural Building Colloquium:
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://naturalbuildingtexas.org";>http://naturalbuildingtexas.org</a>>

Green Building Professionals Directory: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://directory.sustainablesources.com";>http://directory.sustainablesources.com</a>>
Sustainable Building Calendar: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/";>http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/</a>>
Green Real Estate: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/";>http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/</a>>
Straw Bale Registry: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/";>http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/</a>>
Books/videos/software: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/";>http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/</a>>


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Date: 4 Oct 2007 14:28:40 -0500
From: Laura Bartels laura@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Strawbale walling query

Tom,
In my US travels, I have used and seen this used many times, with and
without bale to post contact. I think you are asking more about the
structural integrity of the wall, but your description of the climate
relates as well. First, I agree with Bill that the benefit in terms of
minimizing air infiltration is good when there is a complete wrap of the
posts and continuous unbroken plaster. If the posts interface with the
plaster, then  the detailing at the back of post obviously needs to be
done well. I have seen unfortunate cases where expansion and contraction
has left a vertical gap between the plaster and wood the height of the
post, both sides. That's alot of air and potential moisture.
In situations with a plaster/post interface, there are two good
techniques I  am aware of. A woman timber framer I know in New York uses
the same technique as Bill suggested, though she has found a lightweight
fibered board, like a pressed recycled paper board that is fuzzy and
accepts plaster directly to place on the back of the post. Alternately,
other timber framers are attaching a narrow 1x wood strip to the back of
post before bale installation. This holds bales back from post so that
plaster keys into the remaining space behind the post to create a good
air seal.
If the concern is wall stability, then perhaps slight manual compression
and/or external pinning could provide any additional support needed.
Best of luck to her.
Laura Bartels
Colorado

PS- Tom, I have enjoyed your book very much as a resource for students.



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Date: 4 Oct 2007 14:39:49 -0500
From: cmagwood@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Strawbale walling query

Hello,

Since I'm the Magwood responsible for the book Siobhan is working from, I
guess I should respond...

I know that many might disagree with me (especially those shaky
Californians), but after years of spending all kinds of time anchoring
bales to posts, I stopped doing so. Seemed like the test figures I was
seeing would indicate that the walls weren't going to warp, wiggle or tip
over, especially when wrapped around the outside and tied in via a solid
bale/plaster corner.

If she follows the details for using vapour barrier and mesh strips behind
the posts and tied into the plaster, that's all the anchoring (and
barrier-ing) that I would use.

Of course, others might disagree...!

Chris

>
> I had a meeting today with a young Belfast architect, Siobhan Brown,
> who is designing a strawbale house for a self builder in County
> Fermanagh ~Northern Ireland
>
> I don't think Siobhan has much experience of SB but she has had a
> good go at the design mainly based on details in a book by Chris Magwood
>
> The client wants to built a post and beam structure for the house and
> then wrap the strawbale walls around the outside of the posts.
> She was not proposing to tie the walls into the posts as she says
> that Magwood's details do not show this.
> She was planing to tie the wall plate to the rafters of the roof. The
> house is single storey but with rooms in the loft. so the floor
> joists for the upper floor will be part of the roof structure.
>
> I have misgivings about this . I wonder if anyone has built a
> strawbale house where the bale walls are not load bearing and are
> wrapped around the outside of the structural posts without being tied
> into them? The posts will be about 4 metres apart.
>
> Fermanagh has to have 100% humidity all year round with a lot of
> heavy winds and driving rain. If you stand still for 5 minutes moss
> will grow on your head.  I also think the walls will need a rain screen
>
> I would have thought a more solid structure would involve placing
> sections of bale walls between the posts and being tied into them
>
> Any useful comments and I will pass them onto Siobhan
>
> thanks
>
>
> Tom Woolley
> woolley.tom@...
> Rachel Bevan Architects
> 17A Main Street
> Saintfield
> Ballynahinch
> County Down
> BT24 7AA
> 028 97 512851
>
> also:
> Graduate School of the Environment
> Centre for Alternative Technology
> Unit 7, Dyfi Eco Parc
> Machynlleth
> Powys, SY208AX
>
> 01654 703562
>
>
>
>
>
>
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>
>



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