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GSBN: Digest for 10/9/07



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-> Buffalo Grass Bales
     by Ben bobregon@...
-> Re: GSBN:Buffalo Grass Bales
     by cmagwood@...
-> Re: Buffalo Grass Bales
     by Derek Roff derek@...
-> Re: GSBN:Buffalo Grass Bales
     by Chris Stafford Stafford@...
-> Buffalo Grass Bales
     by Bruce King ecobruce@...
-> Re: GSBN:Re: Buffalo Grass Bales
     by Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...


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Date: 9 Oct 2007 10:50:45 -0500
From: Ben bobregon@...
Subject: Buffalo Grass Bales

Hi All

A couple recently asked me if buffalo grass baled after the seed heads
fell off would work in lieu of the traditional straw (wheat. oats or
rice) that we normally use. My first inclination was to say no, but I
told them I would pose the question to this list to see what the
responses were. Does anyone have any comments or experience to share?


Thank You

Ben Obregon


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Date: 9 Oct 2007 13:09:23 -0500
From: cmagwood@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Buffalo Grass Bales

Ben,

I've had a chance to use switch grass bales, which were awesome. And hemp
is working really well. So does flax, etc. So I'd say if it's fairly
seedless and grassless and tubular, it should work. It probably matters
more how it's baled than what has been baled.

Chris

> Hi All
>
> A couple recently asked me if buffalo grass baled after the seed heads
> fell off would work in lieu of the traditional straw (wheat. oats or
> rice) that we normally use. My first inclination was to say no, but I
> told them I would pose the question to this list to see what the
> responses were. Does anyone have any comments or experience to share?
>
>
> Thank You
>
> Ben Obregon

>
>



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Date: 9 Oct 2007 13:20:57 -0500
From: Derek Roff derek@...
Subject: Re: Buffalo Grass Bales

The buffalo grass that I see is short, flat and fairly fine.  I would
think it would be hard to bale, and I wouldn't want to use it for
building without some level of careful, informal testing.  Of course, a
name like "buffalo grass" may refer to an entirely different plant in
different places.  Different climates could also have a major effect on
the growth of the plant.

derelict

Derek Roff

- --On Tuesday, October 9, 2007 12:46 PM -0400 cmagwood@...:

> Ben,
>
> I've had a chance to use switch grass bales, which were awesome. And
> hemp is working really well. So does flax, etc. So I'd say if it's
> fairly seedless and grassless and tubular, it should work. It
> probably matters more how it's baled than what has been baled.
>
> Chris
>
>> Hi All
>>
>> A couple recently asked me if buffalo grass baled after the seed
>> heads fell off would work in lieu of the traditional straw (wheat.
>> oats or rice) that we normally use. My first inclination was to say
>> no, but I told them I would pose the question to this list to see
>> what the responses were. Does anyone have any comments or experience
>> to share?
>>
>>
>> Thank You
>>
>> Ben Obregon


Derek Roff
Language Learning Center
Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
Internet: derek@...



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 9 Oct 2007 13:31:13 -0500
From: Chris Stafford Stafford@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Buffalo Grass Bales

Ben,
I've used rye grass straw. As long as its matured standing and can be
baled - it can be used. Problem with rye grass was its small stems
packed densely making bales extremely heavy and difficult to handle.
Chris

On Oct 9, 2007, at 9:46 AM, cmagwood@...:

> Ben,
>
> I've had a chance to use switch grass bales, which were awesome. And
> hemp
> is working really well. So does flax, etc. So I'd say if it's fairly
> seedless and grassless and tubular, it should work. It probably matters
> more how it's baled than what has been baled.
>
> Chris
>
>> Hi All
>>
>> A couple recently asked me if buffalo grass baled after the seed heads
>> fell off would work in lieu of the traditional straw (wheat. oats or
>> rice) that we normally use. My first inclination was to say no, but I
>> told them I would pose the question to this list to see what the
>> responses were. Does anyone have any comments or experience to share?
>>
>>
>> Thank You
>>
>> Ben Obregon
>> ----
>> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN
>> list,
>> send email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT
>> line.
>> ----
>>
>>
>

>
>

Christopher Stafford Architects, Inc.
1044 Water Street, #326
Port Townsend, WA 98368
360.379.8541
www.building-green.net




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 9 Oct 2007 13:36:32 -0500
From: Bruce King ecobruce@...
Subject: Buffalo Grass Bales



Zounds, have we forgotten our roots?  (pun intended)

The original and oldest extant bale buildings in Nebraska were made
with the native grasses that were naturally there.  They seem to be
doing OK.

I don't know specifics about Buffalo grass -- and as Derek says, it may
be different in different places -- but my general impression is that
wild grasses will be generally tougher and better for bales than the
weeny hyperfertilized grasses we get from agribusiness (including
Schwarzicalifornianegger rice straw).

Thanks,

Bruce King, PE
Director, Ecological Building Network  ( www.ecobuildnetwork.org )
Publisher, Green Building Press  ( www.greenbuildingpress.com )
11 Mark Drive
San Rafael, CA 94903  USA
(415) 987-7271
bruce@...

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Date: 9 Oct 2007 19:52:26 -0500
From: Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Buffalo Grass Bales

Here in Nebraska, we have used prairie meadow hay for a recently built sb
building constructed on a native prairie (pristine prairie). I've also
worked on a project where we baled Timothy grass when we ran out of wheat to
bale, and know of at least one project that used rye grass bales (good
tensile strength, I'm told). I know of at least one sb home in Kansas with
bales of tall and short bluestem grass and also switchgrass. As for buffalo
grass, I've never seen buffalo grass get very tall and agree with Derek that
it is fine and flat - so wonder if it's the best. If wheat or rye or oats
was available, I'd go with that as first choice. But if we're building with
what we have at hand (as the pioneers did), and if that all that's at
hand...

Joyce

on 10.9.2007 1:13 PM, Derek Roff at derek@...:

> The buffalo grass that I see is short, flat and fairly fine.  I would
> think it would be hard to bale, and I wouldn't want to use it for
> building without some level of careful, informal testing.  Of course, a
> name like "buffalo grass" may refer to an entirely different plant in
> different places.  Different climates could also have a major effect on
> the growth of the plant.
>
> derelict
>
> Derek Roff
>
> --On Tuesday, October 9, 2007 12:46 PM -0400 cmagwood@...:
>
>> Ben,
>>
>> I've had a chance to use switch grass bales, which were awesome. And
>> hemp is working really well. So does flax, etc. So I'd say if it's
>> fairly seedless and grassless and tubular, it should work. It
>> probably matters more how it's baled than what has been baled.
>>
>> Chris
>>
>>> Hi All
>>>
>>> A couple recently asked me if buffalo grass baled after the seed
>>> heads fell off would work in lieu of the traditional straw (wheat.
>>> oats or rice) that we normally use. My first inclination was to say
>>> no, but I told them I would pose the question to this list to see
>>> what the responses were. Does anyone have any comments or experience
>>> to share?
>>>
>>>
>>> Thank You
>>>
>>> Ben Obregon
>
>
> Derek Roff
> Language Learning Center
> Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
> University of New Mexico
> Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
> 505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
> Internet: derek@...
>
> ----
> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list, send
> email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
> ----
>



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