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GSBN: Digest for 10/14/07



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---------------------------------------------------------------------


-> Re: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer
     by Graeme North ecodesign@...
-> Re: GSBN:Some Nice News about DCAT
     by Graeme North ecodesign@...
-> Re: GSBN:Some Nice News about DCAT
     by Graeme North ecodesign@...
-> Re: GSBN:Some Nice News about DCAT
     by "moehlmann" moehlmann@...
-> Re: GSBN: Earth plasters
     by "Chug" chug@...
-> Re: GSBN: Earth plasters
     by David Eisenberg strawnet@...
-> Re: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer
     by Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
-> Moon phase harvesting of timbers
     by "Andy Horn" andy@...
-> Re: GSBN:Moon phase harvesting of timbers
     by billc billc_lists@...
-> Re: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer
     by cmagwood@...
-> RE: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer
     by "Paul Olivier" paul.olivier@...
-> Re: [SPAM?]  RE: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer
     by cmagwood@...


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 00:20:55 -0500
From: Graeme North ecodesign@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer

Thansk Tom

if only our government was not so paranoid about
naughty hemp growing
Wish I could get it

Graeme






- --- Tom Woolley woolley.tom@... wrote:

>
> The best source of information on lime  is to be
> found through
>
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/";>http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/</a>
>
> There are now related organisations in the USA and
> Scandinavia.
>
> Worth subscribing to their journal. There is a
> fantastic article in
> the latest issue Vol 14 by Becky Little and Tom
> Morton
> called "Mixing it with Lime and Clay"
>
> Maybe Tom Morton would send you a copy of the
> article if you ask
> Contact him through his excellent web site.
> Download the info he has
> on unfired earth buildings
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.arc-architects.com/";>http://www.arc-architects.com/</a>
>
> Been reading the responses about cellulose
>
> Hemp is the answer , Hemp-lime plasters/renders
> solve all  problems.
> Doesn't shrink or crack, copes admirably with
> moisture, etc. etc
>
> Just finished writing a guide to hemp-lime
> construction ( well
> almost) yesterday . Should be out in April 2008
> published by BRE/IHS
> Press.
>
> Hemp web sites
> www.hemplime.org.uk
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php";>http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php</a>
>
>
> Tom Woolley
>
>
> On 13 Oct 2007, at 00:44, MattsMyhrman@...
> wrote:
>
> > In a message dated 10/10/2007 1:17:11 PM US
> Mountain Standard Time,
> > andy@...:
> >
> >> Sometimes however lime plaster
> >> was not used and rather a cow dung earth plaster
> was used followed by
> >> regular coats of lime wash...though at the coast
> where we
> >> experience strong
> >> wind driven rains a lime coating was the norm.
> >
> > I believe that many of the cob buildings on the
> southern coast of
> > England
> > (Devon?) used several (maybe 4-5 initially) coats
> of lime wash.  It
> > was
> > considered somewhat sacrificial, and was followed
> up, after a year
> > or two, with a
> > couple more coats.  After that, another coat every
> couple of
> > years.  Maybe Barbara
> > Jones can check in on this  one, and also tell us
> whether lime wash
> > over cob
> > or earth plaster has traditionally been used
> anywhere in the
> > British Isles
> > where they experience driving rains coming in off
> the sea (up on
> > the northwest
> > coast of Scotland?).
> >
> >
> > **************************************
> >  
> > 
> >
> >
> > --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
> > multipart/alternative
> >   text/plain (text body -- kept)
> >   text/html
> > ---
> > ----
> > For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise
> using the GSBN
> > list, send email to GSBN@...
> with HELP in the
> > SUBJECT line.
> > ----
> >
>
> Tom Woolley
> woolley.tom@...
> Rachel Bevan Architects
> 17A Main Street
> Saintfield
> Ballynahinch
> County Down
> BT24 7AA
> 028 97 512851
>
> also:
> Graduate School of the Environment
> Centre for Alternative Technology
> Unit 7, Dyfi Eco Parc
> Machynlleth
> Powys, SY208AX
>
> 01654 703562
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
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> ---
> ----
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> using the GSBN list, send email to
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> ----
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>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 00:23:52 -0500
From: Graeme North ecodesign@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Some Nice News about DCAT

fantastic news David and well deserved

best wishes

Graeme
NZ



- --- David Eisenberg strawnet@... wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> We have some exciting news to share. The Development
> Center for
> Appropriate Technology (DCAT) has been named the
> International Code
> Council (ICC) 2007 Affiliate of the Year. The award
> was presented last
> week at the ICC Annual Conference in Reno, Nevada.
> This is a wonderful
> acknowledgment of DCAT's focus on building
> sustainability into the
> codes over the past dozen years. It is also a great
> 15th birthday
> present for DCAT. We are particularly thrilled to
> share this news with
> all of you because of who you are, what you do, and
> what we are
> achieving together.
>
> (For those from outside the U.S., in spite of its
> name, the ICC is
> actually the U.S. national organization of building
> officials. ICC does
> do international work and has a significant
> influence on codes in the
> rest of the world. Hopefully the influence of the
> parts of the world
> where sustainability is a higher priority will have
> more and more
> infuence on our codes here - what DCAT has been
> working toward for the
> last 12 years.)
>
> Almost six years ago, when DCAT was given a regular
> column (Building
> Codes for Small Planet) in ICBO's Building Standards
> magazine, and
> later in ICC's Building Safety Journal, it marked an
> extraordinary
> occurrence. We had gone into the conservative
> building codes community
> as outside environmental and social justice
> advocates and built
> relationships and trust to such a degree that we
> were invited inside
> and given a platform through which to educate the
> codes community about
> issues of sustainability. Today, with the ICC
> Affiliate of the Year
> Award, and with the growing leadership being shown
> by ICC and the codes
> community, it's clear that this work is paying off.
> We're now planning
> to take the work to the next level and share what
> we've learned over
> the past dozen years in new areas where we believe
> it can help enable
> positive change, through relocalization strategies
> and working with
> communities and local governments as we seek to ways
> to create the
> world we want, not just prevent what we don't want.
>
> There can be no doubt that there is a significant
> shift happening in
> the world of building and development. We know that
> we are just part of
> a much larger movement and that the work that all of
> you do has also
> been crucial to this shift. We encourage you to take
> the time to both
> acknowledge how much we all have accomplished and
> how much more work
> there is yet to do.
>
> We've gotten this much done by taking first steps
> and then the next
> step and the next. We hope you will join us in
> abandoning all our
> excuses and continuing to take the largest steps we
> can toward a truly
> sustainable built environment and society. I think
> you'd agree that it
> has never been more important.
>
> If you feel that our work has benefited your work or
> think it's
> important, please help support it as we continue
> moving forward. Visit
> our website - www.dcat.net - to see what else we're
> up to and to find
> out more about how you can help support this work.
>
> We invite you to share this news with your friends
> and colleagues.
>
> With warmest regards,
>
> David Eisenberg
> Director
>
>
> Media Release
>
> October 12, 2007
>
> Acknowledging the pioneering work of David Eisenberg
> and the
> Development Center for Appropriate Technology (DCAT)
> in promoting
> sustainability in building and building codes, the
> International Code
> Council (ICC) named DCAT their 2007 Affiliate of the
> Year. The award
> was presented at the ICC Annual Conference in Reno,
> Nevada on October
> 3rd. The ICC Affiliate Award is given in recognition
> of an individual
> or organization that consistently demonstrates
> integrity,
> professionalism and dedication to building code
> development, public
> safety, and public service.
>
> "David's decades of work in green building education
> and code
> development for alternative building materials has
> helped make
> sustainability a common concept," said International
> Code Council
> Immediate Past President Wally Bailey. #226#AuAs a
> regular contributor to
> ICC's magazine, Building Safety Journal, David
> explains how building
> codes can support the responsible use of resources
> to create safe and
> sustainable communities. As the Code Council
> continues to define its
> role in green building, we have David to thank for
> educating us on how
> to include sustainability into the codes and protect
> our world for
> generations to come."
>
> The ICC Awards video shown at the opening plenary
> session of the
> conference noted: #226#AuCurrently Chair of the U.S.
> Green Building Council#226#Aos
> Code Committee, David played a key role in the
> agreement between the
> USGBC and the ICC to promote a joint effort to
> educate building
> officials about green building and include green
> building practices in
> the I-Codes.#226#A?  The first results of that agreement
> were the half-day
> and full-day green building education classes that
> David, the USGBC
> Code Committee, ICC staff, and others developed and
> taught at the
> conference in Reno. In addition, we#226#Aore helping
> develop a guide to
> sustainability and green building is in development
> that will be
> jointly published by ICC and USGBC.
>
> DCAT#226#Aos ten-year-old program, Building
> Sustainability into the Codes,
> has included a wide variety of activities and
> efforts to educate the
> building codes community about the full range of
> consequences, risks
> and responsibilities involved in safeguarding public
> health, safety and
> welfare in relation to the built environment. The
> collaborative
> approach and quality of relationships DCAT developed
> resulted in the
> opportunity to help create six feature issues and
> dozens of articles on
> topics related to sustainability and green building
> in the magazines of
> ICC and the legacy code groups. Additionally, DCAT
> was given a regular
> column called #226#AuBuilding Codes for a Small
> Planet#226#A? in Building Standards
> magazine and later in ICC#226#Aos Building Safety
> Journal. DCAT also produced
> an educational video with the same name for building
> officials. That
> video is currently available from DCAT on DVD.
>
> DCAT is a Tucson, Arizona-based nonprofit
> organization celebrating its
> 15th year. DCAT works to enhance the health of the
> planet and our
> communities by promoting a shift to sustainable
> construction and
> development through leadership, strategic
> relationships, and education.
>
=== message truncated ===



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 00:23:57 -0500
From: Graeme North ecodesign@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Some Nice News about DCAT

fantastic news David and well deserved

best wishes

Graeme
NZ



- --- David Eisenberg strawnet@... wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> We have some exciting news to share. The Development
> Center for
> Appropriate Technology (DCAT) has been named the
> International Code
> Council (ICC) 2007 Affiliate of the Year. The award
> was presented last
> week at the ICC Annual Conference in Reno, Nevada.
> This is a wonderful
> acknowledgment of DCAT's focus on building
> sustainability into the
> codes over the past dozen years. It is also a great
> 15th birthday
> present for DCAT. We are particularly thrilled to
> share this news with
> all of you because of who you are, what you do, and
> what we are
> achieving together.
>
> (For those from outside the U.S., in spite of its
> name, the ICC is
> actually the U.S. national organization of building
> officials. ICC does
> do international work and has a significant
> influence on codes in the
> rest of the world. Hopefully the influence of the
> parts of the world
> where sustainability is a higher priority will have
> more and more
> infuence on our codes here - what DCAT has been
> working toward for the
> last 12 years.)
>
> Almost six years ago, when DCAT was given a regular
> column (Building
> Codes for Small Planet) in ICBO's Building Standards
> magazine, and
> later in ICC's Building Safety Journal, it marked an
> extraordinary
> occurrence. We had gone into the conservative
> building codes community
> as outside environmental and social justice
> advocates and built
> relationships and trust to such a degree that we
> were invited inside
> and given a platform through which to educate the
> codes community about
> issues of sustainability. Today, with the ICC
> Affiliate of the Year
> Award, and with the growing leadership being shown
> by ICC and the codes
> community, it's clear that this work is paying off.
> We're now planning
> to take the work to the next level and share what
> we've learned over
> the past dozen years in new areas where we believe
> it can help enable
> positive change, through relocalization strategies
> and working with
> communities and local governments as we seek to ways
> to create the
> world we want, not just prevent what we don't want.
>
> There can be no doubt that there is a significant
> shift happening in
> the world of building and development. We know that
> we are just part of
> a much larger movement and that the work that all of
> you do has also
> been crucial to this shift. We encourage you to take
> the time to both
> acknowledge how much we all have accomplished and
> how much more work
> there is yet to do.
>
> We've gotten this much done by taking first steps
> and then the next
> step and the next. We hope you will join us in
> abandoning all our
> excuses and continuing to take the largest steps we
> can toward a truly
> sustainable built environment and society. I think
> you'd agree that it
> has never been more important.
>
> If you feel that our work has benefited your work or
> think it's
> important, please help support it as we continue
> moving forward. Visit
> our website - www.dcat.net - to see what else we're
> up to and to find
> out more about how you can help support this work.
>
> We invite you to share this news with your friends
> and colleagues.
>
> With warmest regards,
>
> David Eisenberg
> Director
>
>
> Media Release
>
> October 12, 2007
>
> Acknowledging the pioneering work of David Eisenberg
> and the
> Development Center for Appropriate Technology (DCAT)
> in promoting
> sustainability in building and building codes, the
> International Code
> Council (ICC) named DCAT their 2007 Affiliate of the
> Year. The award
> was presented at the ICC Annual Conference in Reno,
> Nevada on October
> 3rd. The ICC Affiliate Award is given in recognition
> of an individual
> or organization that consistently demonstrates
> integrity,
> professionalism and dedication to building code
> development, public
> safety, and public service.
>
> "David's decades of work in green building education
> and code
> development for alternative building materials has
> helped make
> sustainability a common concept," said International
> Code Council
> Immediate Past President Wally Bailey. #226#AuAs a
> regular contributor to
> ICC's magazine, Building Safety Journal, David
> explains how building
> codes can support the responsible use of resources
> to create safe and
> sustainable communities. As the Code Council
> continues to define its
> role in green building, we have David to thank for
> educating us on how
> to include sustainability into the codes and protect
> our world for
> generations to come."
>
> The ICC Awards video shown at the opening plenary
> session of the
> conference noted: #226#AuCurrently Chair of the U.S.
> Green Building Council#226#Aos
> Code Committee, David played a key role in the
> agreement between the
> USGBC and the ICC to promote a joint effort to
> educate building
> officials about green building and include green
> building practices in
> the I-Codes.#226#A?  The first results of that agreement
> were the half-day
> and full-day green building education classes that
> David, the USGBC
> Code Committee, ICC staff, and others developed and
> taught at the
> conference in Reno. In addition, we#226#Aore helping
> develop a guide to
> sustainability and green building is in development
> that will be
> jointly published by ICC and USGBC.
>
> DCAT#226#Aos ten-year-old program, Building
> Sustainability into the Codes,
> has included a wide variety of activities and
> efforts to educate the
> building codes community about the full range of
> consequences, risks
> and responsibilities involved in safeguarding public
> health, safety and
> welfare in relation to the built environment. The
> collaborative
> approach and quality of relationships DCAT developed
> resulted in the
> opportunity to help create six feature issues and
> dozens of articles on
> topics related to sustainability and green building
> in the magazines of
> ICC and the legacy code groups. Additionally, DCAT
> was given a regular
> column called #226#AuBuilding Codes for a Small
> Planet#226#A? in Building Standards
> magazine and later in ICC#226#Aos Building Safety
> Journal. DCAT also produced
> an educational video with the same name for building
> officials. That
> video is currently available from DCAT on DVD.
>
> DCAT is a Tucson, Arizona-based nonprofit
> organization celebrating its
> 15th year. DCAT works to enhance the health of the
> planet and our
> communities by promoting a shift to sustainable
> construction and
> development through leadership, strategic
> relationships, and education.
>
=== message truncated ===



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 03:31:40 -0500
From: "moehlmann" moehlmann@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Some Nice News about DCAT

Dear David,
congretulations and all the best with continuing senses of expansion....
Martin Oehlmann

- ----- Original Message ----- 
From: "David Eisenberg" strawnet@...
To: GSBN@...
Sent: Saturday, October 13, 2007 11:18 PM
Subject: GSBN:Some Nice News about DCAT


Hi all,

We have some exciting news to share. The Development Center for
Appropriate Technology (DCAT) has been named the International Code
Council (ICC) 2007 Affiliate of the Year. The award was presented last
week at the ICC Annual Conference in Reno, Nevada. This is a wonderful
acknowledgment of DCAT's focus on building sustainability into the
codes over the past dozen years. It is also a great 15th birthday
present for DCAT. We are particularly thrilled to share this news with
all of you because of who you are, what you do, and what we are
achieving together.

(For those from outside the U.S., in spite of its name, the ICC is
actually the U.S. national organization of building officials. ICC does
do international work and has a significant influence on codes in the
rest of the world. Hopefully the influence of the parts of the world
where sustainability is a higher priority will have more and more
infuence on our codes here - what DCAT has been working toward for the
last 12 years.)

Almost six years ago, when DCAT was given a regular column (Building
Codes for Small Planet) in ICBO's Building Standards magazine, and
later in ICC's Building Safety Journal, it marked an extraordinary
occurrence. We had gone into the conservative building codes community
as outside environmental and social justice advocates and built
relationships and trust to such a degree that we were invited inside
and given a platform through which to educate the codes community about
issues of sustainability. Today, with the ICC Affiliate of the Year
Award, and with the growing leadership being shown by ICC and the codes
community, it's clear that this work is paying off. We're now planning
to take the work to the next level and share what we've learned over
the past dozen years in new areas where we believe it can help enable
positive change, through relocalization strategies and working with
communities and local governments as we seek to ways to create the
world we want, not just prevent what we don't want.

There can be no doubt that there is a significant shift happening in
the world of building and development. We know that we are just part of
a much larger movement and that the work that all of you do has also
been crucial to this shift. We encourage you to take the time to both
acknowledge how much we all have accomplished and how much more work
there is yet to do.

We've gotten this much done by taking first steps and then the next
step and the next. We hope you will join us in abandoning all our
excuses and continuing to take the largest steps we can toward a truly
sustainable built environment and society. I think you'd agree that it
has never been more important.

If you feel that our work has benefited your work or think it's
important, please help support it as we continue moving forward. Visit
our website - www.dcat.net - to see what else we're up to and to find
out more about how you can help support this work.

We invite you to share this news with your friends and colleagues.

With warmest regards,

David Eisenberg
Director


Media Release

October 12, 2007

Acknowledging the pioneering work of David Eisenberg and the
Development Center for Appropriate Technology (DCAT) in promoting
sustainability in building and building codes, the International Code
Council (ICC) named DCAT their 2007 Affiliate of the Year. The award
was presented at the ICC Annual Conference in Reno, Nevada on October
3rd. The ICC Affiliate Award is given in recognition of an individual
or organization that consistently demonstrates integrity,
professionalism and dedication to building code development, public
safety, and public service.

"David's decades of work in green building education and code
development for alternative building materials has helped make
sustainability a common concept," said International Code Council
Immediate Past President Wally Bailey. =E2=80=9CAs a regular contributor to
ICC's magazine, Building Safety Journal, David explains how building
codes can support the responsible use of resources to create safe and
sustainable communities. As the Code Council continues to define its
role in green building, we have David to thank for educating us on how
to include sustainability into the codes and protect our world for
generations to come."

The ICC Awards video shown at the opening plenary session of the
conference noted: =E2=80=9CCurrently Chair of the U.S. Green Building
Council=E2=80=99s
Code Committee, David played a key role in the agreement between the
USGBC and the ICC to promote a joint effort to educate building
officials about green building and include green building practices in
the I-Codes.=E2=80=9D  The first results of that agreement were the half-day
and full-day green building education classes that David, the USGBC
Code Committee, ICC staff, and others developed and taught at the
conference in Reno. In addition, we=E2=80=99re helping develop a guide to
sustainability and green building is in development that will be
jointly published by ICC and USGBC.

DCAT=E2=80=99s ten-year-old program, Building Sustainability into the Codes,
has included a wide variety of activities and efforts to educate the
building codes community about the full range of consequences, risks
and responsibilities involved in safeguarding public health, safety and
welfare in relation to the built environment. The collaborative
approach and quality of relationships DCAT developed resulted in the
opportunity to help create six feature issues and dozens of articles on
topics related to sustainability and green building in the magazines of
ICC and the legacy code groups. Additionally, DCAT was given a regular
column called =E2=80=9CBuilding Codes for a Small Planet=E2=80=9D in Building
Standards
magazine and later in ICC=E2=80=99s Building Safety Journal. DCAT also
produced
an educational video with the same name for building officials. That
video is currently available from DCAT on DVD.

DCAT is a Tucson, Arizona-based nonprofit organization celebrating its
15th year. DCAT works to enhance the health of the planet and our
communities by promoting a shift to sustainable construction and
development through leadership, strategic relationships, and education.
The International Code Council is a membership association dedicated to
building safety and fire prevention. ICC develops the International
Codes, an integrated set of building codes that are the most widely
accepted building codes in the U.S.

For more information visit the DCAT website - www.dcat.net or the
website of the International Code Council - www.iccsafe.org

Contact:
David Eisenberg, Director
Development Center for Appropriate Technology
P.O. Box 27513, Tucson, Arizona 85726-7513
(520) 624-6628, (520)-798-3701 Fax
www.dcat.net

________________________________________________________________________
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email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
- ----





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 09:39:03 -0500
From: "Chug" chug@...
Subject: Re: GSBN: Earth plasters

Greetings earth plasterheads

I'm catching up with this thread after working away in a dead spot with no
pc/phone access, pure bliss mostly but helpful to realise the usefulness of
the communication age, anyway I digress, In my own experimentation with and
application of earthen renders I have, rightly or wrongly come to some
conclusions.

1. Earth/Clay is very different in different places, one lot dug from
beneath the foundations of the building can be very different fom that dug
from just 50m away.
2. Trial tests on bales with different mixes is a must.
3.When using earthen/clay render I've had kids from 18 months old right
through to 80 year olds all getting stuck in with no goggles, gloves etc
needed, a much different case when using lime where I have to make sure
everyone is fully protected and cannot  let young kids anywhere near! and
the young kids absolutely love it when mums and dads who usually say KEEP
AWAY FROM THE MUD! are suddenly encouraging them to get a load in their
hands and smear it on a wall?

My basic tests are arrived at from various people/sources,
1. Drop test, drop a ball of the mix arm outstretched from shoulder height
to the floor, I like the ball to deform quite a lot but not break into
clumps, if it stays as a round ball then there is too much clay and the
render will crack, if it breaks apart there is not enough clay and the
render will powder off.
2. Smear some of the mix onto my hairy arm, too much clay and I'm picking it
out forever, not enough clay and it powders off when rubbed.
3. Form a small sausage about the size of your little finger then try to
make the ends meet, they should meet maybe with a few small cracks but still
stay intact, if it cracks badly or breaks there is not enough clay, if the
ends meets with no cracking then there is too much clay.
4. Make some different mixes with more or less clay or sand, and try adding
some chopped straw to some of the mixes and apply on some bales, if it stays
stuck when rubbed hard when dry but has cracked badly there is probably too
much clay, if it has no cracks but powders when rubbed hard then there is
too much sand, if it has a few small cracks and stays well attached it's
probably about the right mix which you can then adjust slightly either way
and try again.

I have also mixed earth/clay with lime/sand (in this instance we substituted
half the sand in our 3:1 mix with clay dug from the site) to make a lime
stabilised earthen render for use as a base coat which was some of the best
render I have worked with, very sticky stuff, and this base coat was 'only
just' touch hard when the second coat of straight 3:1 sand/lime was applied
and it had no cracking and almost 4 years later it still looks as good as
new.

I think if you get the mix right with earthen render then it's magical stuff
to work with but without proper testing to get the mix to what I felt was
right I could so easily have ended up using one of the bad test mixes that
would have ultimately meant lots of problems with adhesion or later cracking
and coming away from the wall.

After a couple of pints of Guiness I hope this all makes sense!
plaster on
Chug
chug@...
<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.strawbale-building.co.uk/";>http://www.strawbale-building.co.uk/</a>
.




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 11:30:26 -0500
From: David Eisenberg strawnet@...
Subject: Re: GSBN: Earth plasters

Chug wrote:

After a couple of pints of Guiness I hope this all makes sense!
plaster on
Chug

======

Dear Chug,

Thanks for that excellent description of your approach to working with
clay plasters and for sharing your clay plaster tests.

It's still morning here in Tucson, so I'll be waiting until later to
see if your message passes the
"After-a-couple-of-pints-of-Guiness-I-hope-this-all-makes-sense" test!
But it sounds like a reasonable and perhaps important test to include,
given the proclivities of so many of the balers I know from around the
world...

And while I'm at it, I'll drink one in gratitude to all of you, for
your thanks, your congratulations for our award, for your support, and
for all that each of you does every day, everywhere.

And I was thinking that it would be great if anyone who works with clay
plasters and has more or different tests or approaches would share them
so we might end up with a comprehensive list of them. Then perhaps
Joyce could compile them in an article in The Last Straw. I'd gladly
share mine if I had anything different to add, because I've not been
doing this kind of work and only occasionally have the opportunity to
get, kid-like, into the mud and play and work in it.

David Eisenberg
www.dcat.net
________________________________________________________________________
Email and AIM finally together. You've gotta check out free AOL Mail! -
<a  target="_blank" href="http://mail.aol.com";>http://mail.aol.com</a>


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 13:19:39 -0500
From: Joyce Coppinger jc10508@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer

And the same is true of the paranoia of DEA in the United States.

Joyce.


> Thanks Tom
>
> if only our government was not so paranoid about
> naughty hemp growing
> Wish I could get it
>
> Graeme
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --- Tom Woolley woolley.tom@... wrote:
>
>>
>> The best source of information on lime  is to be
>> found through
>>
>> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/";>http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/</a>
>>
>> There are now related organisations in the USA and
>> Scandinavia.
>>
>> Worth subscribing to their journal. There is a
>> fantastic article in
>> the latest issue Vol 14 by Becky Little and Tom
>> Morton
>> called "Mixing it with Lime and Clay"
>>
>> Maybe Tom Morton would send you a copy of the
>> article if you ask
>> Contact him through his excellent web site.
>> Download the info he has
>> on unfired earth buildings
>> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.arc-architects.com/";>http://www.arc-architects.com/</a>
>>
>> Been reading the responses about cellulose
>>
>> Hemp is the answer , Hemp-lime plasters/renders
>> solve all  problems.
>> Doesn't shrink or crack, copes admirably with
>> moisture, etc. etc
>>
>> Just finished writing a guide to hemp-lime
>> construction ( well
>> almost) yesterday . Should be out in April 2008
>> published by BRE/IHS
>> Press.
>>
>> Hemp web sites
>> www.hemplime.org.uk
>> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php";>http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php</a>
>>
>>
>> Tom Woolley
>>
>>
>> On 13 Oct 2007, at 00:44, MattsMyhrman@...
>> wrote:
>>
>>> In a message dated 10/10/2007 1:17:11 PM US
>> Mountain Standard Time,
>>> andy@...:
>>>
>>>> Sometimes however lime plaster
>>>> was not used and rather a cow dung earth plaster
>> was used followed by
>>>> regular coats of lime wash...though at the coast
>> where we
>>>> experience strong
>>>> wind driven rains a lime coating was the norm.
>>>
>>> I believe that many of the cob buildings on the
>> southern coast of
>>> England
>>> (Devon?) used several (maybe 4-5 initially) coats
>> of lime wash.  It
>>> was
>>> considered somewhat sacrificial, and was followed
>> up, after a year
>>> or two, with a
>>> couple more coats.  After that, another coat every
>> couple of
>>> years.  Maybe Barbara
>>> Jones can check in on this  one, and also tell us
>> whether lime wash
>>> over cob
>>> or earth plaster has traditionally been used
>> anywhere in the
>>> British Isles
>>> where they experience driving rains coming in off
>> the sea (up on
>>> the northwest
>>> coast of Scotland?).
>>>
>>>
>>> **************************************
>>> 
>>> 
>>>
>>>
>>> --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
>>> multipart/alternative
>>> text/plain (text body -- kept)
>>> text/html
>>> ---
>>> ----
>>> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise
>> using the GSBN
>>> list, send email to GSBN@...
>> with HELP in the
>>> SUBJECT line.
>>> ----
>>>
>>
>> Tom Woolley
>> woolley.tom@...
>> Rachel Bevan Architects
>> 17A Main Street
>> Saintfield
>> Ballynahinch
>> County Down
>> BT24 7AA
>> 028 97 512851
>>
>> also:
>> Graduate School of the Environment
>> Centre for Alternative Technology
>> Unit 7, Dyfi Eco Parc
>> Machynlleth
>> Powys, SY208AX
>>
>> 01654 703562
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
>> multipart/alternative
>> text/plain (text body -- kept)
>> text/html
>> ---
>> ----
>> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise
>> using the GSBN list, send email to
>> GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT
>> line.
>> ----
>>
>>
>
> ----
> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list, send
> email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
> ----
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 13:23:56 -0500
From: "Andy Horn" andy@...
Subject: Moon phase harvesting of timbers

Hi all,

I guess I may as well get another stimulating topic started now that I=92m at
it. Indeed I guess this and some of what follows from this should be
included in one of the upcoming Last Straw editions???

 

As an environmentalist, I am horrified by the use of so many noxious and
usually carcinogenic timber preservative treatments used in our construction
industry. As such I have always made sure the timbers we use are treated as
non-toxically as possible =96 which has meant getting or self treating using
boron treatment (mammal friendly). Over the years I=92ve heard from various
farmers and country builders that in times past their forefathers used to
harvest their poplar beams and =93Spanish reed=94 (thin bamboo species) for
their houses around the autumn &amp; early winter new moon so as to prevent
insect attack.

 

Then in Japan =96 where they have a similar practice of moon phase harvesting
=96 I met a professor who had conducted a series of scientific experiments on
how moon phase harvesting as well as aging with braches and bark will affect
insect attack as well as checking/splitting and warping. Besides simple
observation, she examined the sap content under a microscope and tested a
whole variety of harvesting times. (I can send jpg=92s to anyone interested). 

 

What she explained was that one needs to harvest between the times of the
autumn equinox and winter solstice on the 3rd, 2nd, and last day proceeding
the new moon i.e. in the waning phase of the moon only and not on the
day/time of the new moon itself. Once felled, the timbers are left falling
at a slope, with their cut ends propped up higher than the rest of the
trunk. The timber is then initially cured in the forest with their bark, as
well as the crown of the tree and a few side branches with leaves left
intact. The timbers they were cutting (600mm diameter) was left for 3 - 4
months. She explained that the idea is to ensure that the timber is
virtually totally free of the sap, which is the food the insects are after.
By propping the stem up and aging with a few branches and bark, the tree
pulls the last traces of sap to its extremities as it dies.

 

A tree surgeon friend of mine has since concurred that during the autumn
winter phase, trees go into a sort of hibernation and will typically slow
their growth right down. When doing this - because they are less active and
have less nutrient rich sap moving around - they pull various other resins
and anti-bodies up from their root system to assist in fighting off the
insect and fungal attack. Once mid winter is past, trees start to wake up
again in preparation for spring and the sap will start to rise back into the
tree. 

 

Since my return I began experimenting with this myself. I was curious if
this would still work here in the Cape, where we have winter rainfall. I was
also curious to see what would happen with some of our local hardwood
species like the invasive eucalyptus/gum species as the Japanese professor
had be experimenting with their species of spuce and beach. The first time I
experimented, I cut some gums (at the prescribed time) and did not bother to
lift the trees up off the forest floor as the forest floor was steeply
sloped so simply made sure they lay with their branches pointing down slope.
I left the timber on the moist leave covered (though well drained) forest
floor for 6 months. Upon my return I discovered that the timber had cured
beautifully and besides a bit of brown staining on the bottom half, were in
perfect condition. Not one single insect had touched the timber, no dry rot
had occurred and no cracks or splitting was evident. I have continued with
this practice ever since and am so confident about it that I do it many of
with as many of my projects as possible.

 

I goggled moon phase harvesting and came across a reference to the Austrian
wood cutters of times past having branded their timber according to which
moon cycle their timbers were harvested. Apparently firewood is best cut at
a full moon. Violin and cello makers followed certain bio-dynamic practises
and used to accompany the wood cutters into the forests to ensure that their
timbers where cut at certain precise times, which apparently also needed to
coincide with certain planetary cycles. This apparently ensured the perfect
resonance for their instruments. 

 

I am curious about whether any of this is familiar to any of you out there
and what kind of experience you have had with these methods or further
insights that might be added.

 

Andy Horn

 

ECO DESIGN
Architects &amp; Consultants
A. R. HORN B.A.S. (UCT), B.Arch (UCT), Pr.Arch (SACAP),     MIA, CIA
Telephone: 021 462 1614, Fax: 021 461 3198

Cel: 082 67 62110
4th Flr, The Armoury
160 Sir Lowry Rd
CAPE TOWN
7925

web site: www.ecodesignarchitects.co.za

email: andy@...

 

 

 

 


No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition. 
Version: 7.5.488 / Virus Database: 269.14.8/1064 - Release Date: 2007/10/11
03:09 PM
 


- --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
multipart/alternative
  text/plain (text body -- kept)
  text/html
- ---


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 16:51:51 -0500
From: billc billc_lists@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Moon phase harvesting of timbers

At 8:14 PM +0000 10/14/07, Andy Horn wrote:
>I am curious about whether any of this is familiar to any of you out there
>and what kind of experience you have had with these methods or further
>insights that might be added.

Facinating stuff about the moon phase research.  It's nice to hear
that there's scientific corroboration.   It doesn't surprise me -
farmers have been planting and harvesting by the moon for ages (the
smart ones, anyway), and I've long been aware that the fall is the
best harvest time for trees due to their moving into a dormant phase
(and often wondered if that isn't one of many contributors to the low
quality of store-bought wood).   Similar is true for fruit tree &amp;
vine pruning, which is something I dabble in.

I'd be interested in the jpgs.


- --
Bill Christensen
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://sustainablesources.com/contact/";>http://sustainablesources.com/contact/</a>>

Don't miss October's Natural Building Colloquium:
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://naturalbuildingtexas.org";>http://naturalbuildingtexas.org</a>>

Green Building Professionals Directory: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://directory.sustainablesources.com";>http://directory.sustainablesources.com</a>>
Sustainable Building Calendar: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/";>http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/</a>>
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Books/videos/software: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/";>http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/</a>>


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 20:03:47 -0500
From: cmagwood@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer

I would concur that interesting and largely positive things happen when
mixing lime with hemp! I make an oatmeally mixture of lime, gypsum and
chopped hemp that makes an expanding (slightly) insulation for around
windows and doors to replace the dreaded expanding foam that everybody is
so fond of up here.

The same mix works very well for making cordwood walls... the resulting
mix is strong enough to be the bearing matrix and insulative enough that
one can dispense with having to make an inner and outer mortar layer with
loose fill in between.

"Some chemistry" goes on between the lime and the high-silica hemp hurd
that actually produces a mild bubbling/foaming action, making it the one
mortar that swells slightly instead of shrinking.

This summer I hope to use this mix as an insulative base under an earthen
floor. We'll see what happens!

Chris

>
> The best source of information on lime  is to be found through
>
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/";>http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/</a>
>
> There are now related organisations in the USA and Scandinavia.
>
> Worth subscribing to their journal. There is a fantastic article in
> the latest issue Vol 14 by Becky Little and Tom Morton
> called "Mixing it with Lime and Clay"
>
> Maybe Tom Morton would send you a copy of the article if you ask
> Contact him through his excellent web site.  Download the info he has
> on unfired earth buildings
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.arc-architects.com/";>http://www.arc-architects.com/</a>
>
> Been reading the responses about cellulose
>
> Hemp is the answer , Hemp-lime plasters/renders solve all  problems.
> Doesn't shrink or crack, copes admirably with  moisture, etc. etc
>
> Just finished writing a guide to hemp-lime construction ( well
> almost) yesterday . Should be out in April 2008 published by BRE/IHS
> Press.
>
> Hemp web sites
> www.hemplime.org.uk
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php";>http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php</a>
>
>
> Tom Woolley
>
>
> On 13 Oct 2007, at 00:44, MattsMyhrman@...:
>
>> In a message dated 10/10/2007 1:17:11 PM US Mountain Standard Time,
>> andy@...:
>>
>>> Sometimes however lime plaster
>>> was not used and rather a cow dung earth plaster was used followed by
>>> regular coats of lime wash...though at the coast where we
>>> experience strong
>>> wind driven rains a lime coating was the norm.
>>
>> I believe that many of the cob buildings on the southern coast of
>> England
>> (Devon?) used several (maybe 4-5 initially) coats of lime wash.  It
>> was
>> considered somewhat sacrificial, and was followed up, after a year
>> or two, with a
>> couple more coats.  After that, another coat every couple of
>> years.  Maybe Barbara
>> Jones can check in on this  one, and also tell us whether lime wash
>> over cob
>> or earth plaster has traditionally been used anywhere in the
>> British Isles
>> where they experience driving rains coming in off the sea (up on
>> the northwest
>> coast of Scotland?).
>>
>>
>> **************************************
>>  
>> 
>>
>>
>> --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
>> multipart/alternative
>>   text/plain (text body -- kept)
>>   text/html
>> ---
>> ----
>> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN
>> list, send email to GSBN@...HELP in the
>> SUBJECT line.
>> ----
>>
>
> Tom Woolley
> woolley.tom@...
> Rachel Bevan Architects
> 17A Main Street
> Saintfield
> Ballynahinch
> County Down
> BT24 7AA
> 028 97 512851
>
> also:
> Graduate School of the Environment
> Centre for Alternative Technology
> Unit 7, Dyfi Eco Parc
> Machynlleth
> Powys, SY208AX
>
> 01654 703562
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
> multipart/alternative
>   text/plain (text body -- kept)
>   text/html
> ---

>
>



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 21:07:26 -0500
From: "Paul Olivier" paul.olivier@...
Subject: RE: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer

Chris,

In the place of hemp, have you ever considered using chopped rice hulls.
They also contain a lot of silica.

Thanks.
Paul

Paul A. Olivier
ESR International LLC
27c Pham Hong Thai, Ward 10
Dalat City
Lam Dong Province
Vietnam

Louisiana telephone: 1-337-447-4124 (rings Vietnam)
Texas telephone: 1-214-306-8746 (rings Vietnam)
Mobile: 090-6458735 (in Vietnam)
Mobile: 84-90-6458735 (outside Vietnam)
New website: <a  target="_blank" href="http://esrint.com/";>http://esrint.com/</a>
Old Website: <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.esrla.com/";>http://www.esrla.com/</a>
Skype address: Xpolivier

- -----Original Message-----
From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] On Behalf Of
cmagwood@...
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2007 7:52 AM
To: GSBN
Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer

I would concur that interesting and largely positive things happen when
mixing lime with hemp! I make an oatmeally mixture of lime, gypsum and
chopped hemp that makes an expanding (slightly) insulation for around
windows and doors to replace the dreaded expanding foam that everybody is
so fond of up here.

The same mix works very well for making cordwood walls... the resulting
mix is strong enough to be the bearing matrix and insulative enough that
one can dispense with having to make an inner and outer mortar layer with
loose fill in between.

"Some chemistry" goes on between the lime and the high-silica hemp hurd
that actually produces a mild bubbling/foaming action, making it the one
mortar that swells slightly instead of shrinking.

This summer I hope to use this mix as an insulative base under an earthen
floor. We'll see what happens!

Chris

>
> The best source of information on lime  is to be found through
>
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/";>http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/</a>
>
> There are now related organisations in the USA and Scandinavia.
>
> Worth subscribing to their journal. There is a fantastic article in
> the latest issue Vol 14 by Becky Little and Tom Morton
> called "Mixing it with Lime and Clay"
>
> Maybe Tom Morton would send you a copy of the article if you ask
> Contact him through his excellent web site.  Download the info he has
> on unfired earth buildings
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.arc-architects.com/";>http://www.arc-architects.com/</a>
>
> Been reading the responses about cellulose
>
> Hemp is the answer , Hemp-lime plasters/renders solve all  problems.
> Doesn't shrink or crack, copes admirably with  moisture, etc. etc
>
> Just finished writing a guide to hemp-lime construction ( well
> almost) yesterday . Should be out in April 2008 published by BRE/IHS
> Press.
>
> Hemp web sites
> www.hemplime.org.uk
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php";>http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php</a>
>
>
> Tom Woolley
>
>
> On 13 Oct 2007, at 00:44, MattsMyhrman@...:
>
>> In a message dated 10/10/2007 1:17:11 PM US Mountain Standard Time,
>> andy@...:
>>
>>> Sometimes however lime plaster
>>> was not used and rather a cow dung earth plaster was used followed by
>>> regular coats of lime wash...though at the coast where we
>>> experience strong
>>> wind driven rains a lime coating was the norm.
>>
>> I believe that many of the cob buildings on the southern coast of
>> England
>> (Devon?) used several (maybe 4-5 initially) coats of lime wash.  It
>> was
>> considered somewhat sacrificial, and was followed up, after a year
>> or two, with a
>> couple more coats.  After that, another coat every couple of
>> years.  Maybe Barbara
>> Jones can check in on this  one, and also tell us whether lime wash
>> over cob
>> or earth plaster has traditionally been used anywhere in the
>> British Isles
>> where they experience driving rains coming in off the sea (up on
>> the northwest
>> coast of Scotland?).
>>
>>
>> **************************************
>>  
>> 
>>
>>
>> --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
>> multipart/alternative
>>   text/plain (text body -- kept)
>>   text/html
>> ---
>> ----
>> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN
>> list, send email to GSBN@...HELP in the
>> SUBJECT line.
>> ----
>>
>
> Tom Woolley
> woolley.tom@...
> Rachel Bevan Architects
> 17A Main Street
> Saintfield
> Ballynahinch
> County Down
> BT24 7AA
> 028 97 512851
>
> also:
> Graduate School of the Environment
> Centre for Alternative Technology
> Unit 7, Dyfi Eco Parc
> Machynlleth
> Powys, SY208AX
>
> 01654 703562
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
> multipart/alternative
>   text/plain (text body -- kept)
>   text/html
> ---

>
>

- ----
For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list, send
email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
- ----




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14 Oct 2007 23:22:20 -0500
From: cmagwood@...
Subject: Re: [SPAM?]  RE: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer

Paul,

In the great long list of materials I'd love to play with, rice hulls
figure highly. But unless somebody who lives a whole lot closer to a rice
paddy than I do sends me a bag full, it's not something I'd ever have
access to!

C

> Chris,
>
> In the place of hemp, have you ever considered using chopped rice hulls.
> They also contain a lot of silica.
>
> Thanks.
> Paul
>
> Paul A. Olivier
> ESR International LLC
> 27c Pham Hong Thai, Ward 10
> Dalat City
> Lam Dong Province
> Vietnam
>
> Louisiana telephone: 1-337-447-4124 (rings Vietnam)
> Texas telephone: 1-214-306-8746 (rings Vietnam)
> Mobile: 090-6458735 (in Vietnam)
> Mobile: 84-90-6458735 (outside Vietnam)
> New website: <a  target="_blank" href="http://esrint.com/";>http://esrint.com/</a>
> Old Website: <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.esrla.com/";>http://www.esrla.com/</a>
> Skype address: Xpolivier
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] On Behalf Of
> cmagwood@...
> Sent: Monday, October 15, 2007 7:52 AM
> To: GSBN
> Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer
>
> I would concur that interesting and largely positive things happen when
> mixing lime with hemp! I make an oatmeally mixture of lime, gypsum and
> chopped hemp that makes an expanding (slightly) insulation for around
> windows and doors to replace the dreaded expanding foam that everybody is
> so fond of up here.
>
> The same mix works very well for making cordwood walls... the resulting
> mix is strong enough to be the bearing matrix and insulative enough that
> one can dispense with having to make an inner and outer mortar layer with
> loose fill in between.
>
> "Some chemistry" goes on between the lime and the high-silica hemp hurd
> that actually produces a mild bubbling/foaming action, making it the one
> mortar that swells slightly instead of shrinking.
>
> This summer I hope to use this mix as an insulative base under an earthen
> floor. We'll see what happens!
>
> Chris
>
>>
>> The best source of information on lime  is to be found through
>>
>> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/";>http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/</a>
>>
>> There are now related organisations in the USA and Scandinavia.
>>
>> Worth subscribing to their journal. There is a fantastic article in
>> the latest issue Vol 14 by Becky Little and Tom Morton
>> called "Mixing it with Lime and Clay"
>>
>> Maybe Tom Morton would send you a copy of the article if you ask
>> Contact him through his excellent web site.  Download the info he has
>> on unfired earth buildings
>> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.arc-architects.com/";>http://www.arc-architects.com/</a>
>>
>> Been reading the responses about cellulose
>>
>> Hemp is the answer , Hemp-lime plasters/renders solve all  problems.
>> Doesn't shrink or crack, copes admirably with  moisture, etc. etc
>>
>> Just finished writing a guide to hemp-lime construction ( well
>> almost) yesterday . Should be out in April 2008 published by BRE/IHS
>> Press.
>>
>> Hemp web sites
>> www.hemplime.org.uk
>> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php";>http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php</a>
>>
>>
>> Tom Woolley
>>
>>
>> On 13 Oct 2007, at 00:44, MattsMyhrman@...:
>>
>>> In a message dated 10/10/2007 1:17:11 PM US Mountain Standard Time,
>>> andy@...:
>>>
>>>> Sometimes however lime plaster
>>>> was not used and rather a cow dung earth plaster was used followed by
>>>> regular coats of lime wash...though at the coast where we
>>>> experience strong
>>>> wind driven rains a lime coating was the norm.
>>>
>>> I believe that many of the cob buildings on the southern coast of
>>> England
>>> (Devon?) used several (maybe 4-5 initially) coats of lime wash.  It
>>> was
>>> considered somewhat sacrificial, and was followed up, after a year
>>> or two, with a
>>> couple more coats.  After that, another coat every couple of
>>> years.  Maybe Barbara
>>> Jones can check in on this  one, and also tell us whether lime wash
>>> over cob
>>> or earth plaster has traditionally been used anywhere in the
>>> British Isles
>>> where they experience driving rains coming in off the sea (up on
>>> the northwest
>>> coast of Scotland?).
>>>
>>>
>>> **************************************
>>>  
>>> 
>>>
>>>
>>> --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
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>>
>> Tom Woolley
>> woolley.tom@...
>> Rachel Bevan Architects
>> 17A Main Street
>> Saintfield
>> Ballynahinch
>> County Down
>> BT24 7AA
>> 028 97 512851
>>
>> also:
>> Graduate School of the Environment
>> Centre for Alternative Technology
>> Unit 7, Dyfi Eco Parc
>> Machynlleth
>> Powys, SY208AX
>>
>> 01654 703562
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
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