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Re: GSBN:Taddelakt



<However, I happen to have a chemist/soap expert here at the moment and she
says that it
basically comes down to soaps that have a high sterine content and
that there are others higher up on the chart.  The most common being
Dr. Bronners.>

Hallelujah !  Another use for Dr. Bronners!!!!

John "I Use it for Toothpaste"  Swearingen


On 10/17/07, Athena &amp; Bill Steen absteen@... wrote:
>
> Here's a few thoughts on the subject.
> By chance some years back I found a young kid in Tucson who had been
> to Morocco and apprenticed with a Tadelakt plasterer.  I don't know
> how much difference one finds between different Tadelakt methods in
> Morocco, but here's what he learned.  After all, the old saying goes,
> every maestro has his own book.
> Anyhow, yes the lime there is impure and has enough particles in it
> that when we prepared a lime putty here the ratio came out to
> something like 1 part lime to 1 part 60 grit marble aggregate.  He
> thought that to be basically similar.  From there he used a small
> putty knife to daub the mixture on the wall in a consistent pattern.
> Once applied he switched to a piece of plastic cut out of the back of
> a quart oil container and used that to essentially smooth and burnish
> the plaster.  He only did one coat rather than two.  After that the
> black olive oil soap was applied (very thin) in successive layers
> with each coat being polished with a smooth stone.  Kind of like the
> Pueblo indians in this country who polish their pottery with Crisco.
> You can layer in tinted lime to get a layered effect.  I think the
> comment about doing an imitation vs the real thing probably falls
> into the category of the kind of comments that reference the "good
> old days" when things used to be superior in nature.  It seems to me
> that it depends more upon who does it and how.  After all, lime is
> lime, marble or calcium aggregate is what it is and black soap is
> what it is.  The soap is basically a gooey slimy material.  It is
> handled by Transmineral here in the States.  However, I happen to
> have a chemist/soap expert here at the moment and she says that it
> basically comes down to soaps that have a high sterine content and
> that there are others higher up on the chart.  The most common being
> Dr. Bronners.
>
> If that Dutch guy Rene reads this he will undoubtedly have something
> to say about it in that he has a contact there with whom he has
> worked. Anyhow, punching Tadelakt into Google will most likely give
> all the results one needs in that Tadelakt masters seem to abound
> these days.
>
> Btw, I have 3 people here at the moment in our Artistry workshop
> whose lime plasters have fallen from their earthen plaster substrates
> and are seeking other options.
>
> B...
> On Oct 17, 2007, at 2:06 AM, Andr&eacute; de Bouter wrote:
>
> > Hello Andy,
> >
> > We (my wife, the kids and I) are driving down to Marakech (Tadelakt
> > heaven) this november where I'll finally be taking a tadelakt
> > workshop.
> > The basic principle is using their local lime (CL in Europe =Calcic
> > Lime
> > = non hyraulic) which is not completely pure nor completely 'cooked',
> > just as the old limes Bill Steen mentioned.
> > This allows for the lime to be used pure (with pigment) with only
> > minor
> > cracking.
> > A second thin layer is applied, which is hard troweled when leather
> > hard. This closes the minor cracks.
> > Then green soap is applied with a flat stone.
> > A mason can do about 4m&#xD3; per day, which makes it quite costly compared
> > to tiles etc.
> > It is traditionally used in Morocco for covering the Hammam's which
> > were
> > made of un stabilized earth.
> > There is only one word that describes the end product : Sumptuous!
> > There are recepies that copy this effect with other limes. In general
> > marble dust (!) is used to avoid excessive cracking and to keep the
> > soft
> > surface. Those who have experience tell me that nothing really is as
> > beautiful as the real stuff. although I agree there is a
> > difference, the
> > 'falsifications' are also effective and beautiful).
> >
> > Tadelakt is watertight (bathtubs and the like can be made with it) but
> > does not breath. So it will not have the advantage of absorbing the
> > moisture and releasing it later as earth plaster has. I intend to
> > use it
> > in the shower and for the sink, but will not cover the rest of the
> > earthen plaster in that room. I agree with Graeme that earth holds up
> > very well by itself. We have our bath in our 'Master' ;-) bedroom.
> > Our 2
> > kids also use it often (in Europe having 2 bathrooms is an exception).
> > We never have even the slightest condensation on our windows nor on
> > the
> > mirror.
> >
> > A beautiful (french) book on the subject is:
> > Le tadelakt, un d?cor ? la chaux by Sol?ne Delahousse ISBN
> > 2-7072-0476-5
> > Look at Amazon to see the cover (but order in your local bookstore ;-)
> > <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.amazon.fr/tadelakt-d%C3%A9cor-%C3%A0-chaux/dp/2707204765";>http://www.amazon.fr/tadelakt-d%C3%A9cor-%C3%A0-chaux/dp/2707204765</a>
> >
> > Bill Steen showed us during ? workhop near Santa F? how he makes
> > something visually similar with kaolin clay. He hard troweled a very
> > thin layer of leather hard pure clay. This also gave a very very very
> > soft/slick surface, but it is not intended to be watertight.
> >
> > Plaster on,
> > Andr?
> >
> > Just to make you all green with envy : this is where we will be for
> > the
> > Taddelakt workshop :
> > <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.riadzinoun.com/tadelakt-stage-anglais.html";>http://www.riadzinoun.com/tadelakt-stage-anglais.html</a>
> > <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.riadzinoun.com/riad_visite1.html";>http://www.riadzinoun.com/riad_visite1.html</a>
> >
> >
> > Andy Horn a ?crit :
> >> Does anyone know about the Moroccan takalak plasters, which are
> >> apparently
> >> used in bathrooms? I believe they are supposedly used in
> >> waterproofing of
> >> baths and showers too?
> >> Andy
> >>
> >> -----Original Message-----
> >> From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] On Behalf Of
> >> Graeme North
> >> Sent: 11 October 2007 09:32 PM
> >> To: GSBN
> >> Subject: Re: GSBN: Earth plasters
> >>
> >>
> >>> Hi Mark  I&#xD5;ve not found mould on earth plasters to be a problem
> >>> I have
> >>>
> >> seen
> >>
> >>> darker surface &#xD2;patches&#xD3; on fermented earthen material eg mud
> >>> bricks or
> >>>
> >> cob
> >>
> >>> where the  mix had sat for a while (weeks) before using and had
> >>> fermented
> >>>
> >> a
> >>
> >>> bit, but I do not think these darker patches that arise from this
> >>> are
> >>>
> >> mould.
> >>
> >>> Mould may occur if the walls are very slow to dry and/or are not
> >>> fully dry
> >>> beneath earth plasters, or else the building does not have
> >>> sufficient
> >>>
> >> eaves
> >>
> >>> and moisture keeps the wall wet.
> >>> I&#xD5;ve got earthen plasters (with paper pulp) in my own bathroom
> >>> where they
> >>>
> >> get
> >>
> >>> really steamy at times, (from showering) which not only dry out
> >>> really
> >>> quickly, but also suck moisture out of towels and wet floors
> >>> keeping the
> >>>
> >> room
> >>
> >>> really dry  there is no mould after three or more years of this,
> >>> even
> >>>
> >> though
> >>
> >>> we live in a wet and humid climate  virtually never less than
> >>> 60%, often
> >>>
> >> well
> >>
> >>> over 80% - 90%.
> >>>
> >>> cheers
> >>>
> >>> Graeme
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Graeme,
> >>>
> >>> Thanks for your submission and insight. The first I'd heard of
> >>>
> >> 'fermenting'
> >>
> >>> straw (or paper) was from some friends from NZ, Sven and Sarah
> >>> Johnston,
> >>> who hosted a workshop and a guest presenter was Tom Raven, the
> >>> colorful
> >>> Frenchman, who uses a fermented mix, like bakers use a yeast
> >>> starter for
> >>> baking breads. Tom swears by this fermenting and concurs with you
> >>> on added
> >>> durability of the earth plasters. The Johnstons found they had
> >>> some mold
> >>> issues, maybe as a result of this mix tho. Have you experience
> >>> any issues
> >>> with molds?
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
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>
> Athena &amp; Bill Steen
> The Canelo Project
> HC1 Box 324
> Canelo/Elgin, AZ 85611
> absteen@...
> www.caneloproject.com
>
>

>



-- 
John Swearingen
Skillful Means, Inc.
Design and Construction
www.skillful-means.com


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