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RE: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer



I know of a lime and rice-hull floor mix...the call "clascalita" and they
use it in layers of 10-15 cm thick as an insulation layer of floor. It is
made of 1 part cement: 1 part Lime (either type): 8 parts rice hulls.

Has anyone ever used something similar? With what results?

Rikki Nitzkin
Aul?s, Lleida, Espa?a
rikkinitzkin@...
(0034)657 33 51 62 
www.casasdepaja.com (Red de Construcci?n con Balas de Paja)
 

> -----Mensaje original-----
> De: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] En nombre de Paul Olivier
> Enviado el: lunes, 15 de octubre de 2007 3:58
> Para: 'GSBN'
> Asunto: RE: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer
> 
> Chris,
> 
> In the place of hemp, have you ever considered using chopped rice hulls.
> They also contain a lot of silica.
> 
> Thanks.
> Paul
> 
> Paul A. Olivier
> ESR International LLC
> 27c Pham Hong Thai, Ward 10
> Dalat City
> Lam Dong Province
> Vietnam
> 
> Louisiana telephone: 1-337-447-4124 (rings Vietnam)
> Texas telephone: 1-214-306-8746 (rings Vietnam)
> Mobile: 090-6458735 (in Vietnam)
> Mobile: 84-90-6458735 (outside Vietnam)
> New website: <a  target="_blank" href="http://esrint.com/";>http://esrint.com/</a>
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> Skype address: Xpolivier
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] On Behalf Of
> cmagwood@...
> Sent: Monday, October 15, 2007 7:52 AM
> To: GSBN
> Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer
> 
> I would concur that interesting and largely positive things happen when
> mixing lime with hemp! I make an oatmeally mixture of lime, gypsum and
> chopped hemp that makes an expanding (slightly) insulation for around
> windows and doors to replace the dreaded expanding foam that everybody is
> so fond of up here.
> 
> The same mix works very well for making cordwood walls... the resulting
> mix is strong enough to be the bearing matrix and insulative enough that
> one can dispense with having to make an inner and outer mortar layer with
> loose fill in between.
> 
> "Some chemistry" goes on between the lime and the high-silica hemp hurd
> that actually produces a mild bubbling/foaming action, making it the one
> mortar that swells slightly instead of shrinking.
> 
> This summer I hope to use this mix as an insulative base under an earthen
> floor. We'll see what happens!
> 
> Chris
> 
> >
> > The best source of information on lime  is to be found through
> >
> > <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/";>http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/</a>
> >
> > There are now related organisations in the USA and Scandinavia.
> >
> > Worth subscribing to their journal. There is a fantastic article in
> > the latest issue Vol 14 by Becky Little and Tom Morton
> > called "Mixing it with Lime and Clay"
> >
> > Maybe Tom Morton would send you a copy of the article if you ask
> > Contact him through his excellent web site.  Download the info he has
> > on unfired earth buildings
> > <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.arc-architects.com/";>http://www.arc-architects.com/</a>
> >
> > Been reading the responses about cellulose
> >
> > Hemp is the answer , Hemp-lime plasters/renders solve all  problems.
> > Doesn't shrink or crack, copes admirably with  moisture, etc. etc
> >
> > Just finished writing a guide to hemp-lime construction ( well
> > almost) yesterday . Should be out in April 2008 published by BRE/IHS
> > Press.
> >
> > Hemp web sites
> > www.hemplime.org.uk
> > <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php";>http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php</a>
> >
> >
> > Tom Woolley
> >
> >
> > On 13 Oct 2007, at 00:44, MattsMyhrman@...:
> >
> >> In a message dated 10/10/2007 1:17:11 PM US Mountain Standard Time,
> >> andy@...:
> >>
> >>> Sometimes however lime plaster
> >>> was not used and rather a cow dung earth plaster was used followed by
> >>> regular coats of lime wash...though at the coast where we
> >>> experience strong
> >>> wind driven rains a lime coating was the norm.
> >>
> >> I believe that many of the cob buildings on the southern coast of
> >> England
> >> (Devon?) used several (maybe 4-5 initially) coats of lime wash.  It
> >> was
> >> considered somewhat sacrificial, and was followed up, after a year
> >> or two, with a
> >> couple more coats.  After that, another coat every couple of
> >> years.  Maybe Barbara
> >> Jones can check in on this  one, and also tell us whether lime wash
> >> over cob
> >> or earth plaster has traditionally been used anywhere in the
> >> British Isles
> >> where they experience driving rains coming in off the sea (up on
> >> the northwest
> >> coast of Scotland?).
> >>
> >>
> >> **************************************
> >>  
> >> 
> >>
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> >
> > Tom Woolley
> > woolley.tom@...
> > Rachel Bevan Architects
> > 17A Main Street
> > Saintfield
> > Ballynahinch
> > County Down
> > BT24 7AA
> > 028 97 512851
> >
> > also:
> > Graduate School of the Environment
> > Centre for Alternative Technology
> > Unit 7, Dyfi Eco Parc
> > Machynlleth
> > Powys, SY208AX
> >
> > 01654 703562
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
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