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GSBN: Digest for 11/2/07



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-> Re: GSBN:New GSBNers
     by billc billc_lists@...
-> RE: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer
     by "Rikki  Nitzkin" rikkinitzkin@...
-> RE: GSBN:Moon phase harvesting of timbers
     by "Rikki  Nitzkin" rikkinitzkin@...


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Date: 2 Nov 2007 00:50:17 -0500
From: billc billc_lists@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:New GSBNers

At 12:22 AM -0500 11/1/07, billc wrote:
>Hi all,
>
>Just back from the Natural Building Colloquium Texas, where we met
>Mark Jacobsen and Ben Yeomans of Redfeather Development - two more in
>our list of "why weren't they on the list yet?" folks.


Oops.  Did I say "Jacobsen"?  I just dug up his business card, and
found that the correct name is Mark Jensen.

Sorry for the mistake.

- --
Bill Christensen
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://sustainablesources.com/contact/";>http://sustainablesources.com/contact/</a>>

Green Building Professionals Directory: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://directory.sustainablesources.com";>http://directory.sustainablesources.com</a>>
Sustainable Building Calendar: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/";>http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/</a>>
Green Real Estate: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/";>http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/</a>>
Straw Bale Registry: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/";>http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/</a>>
Books/videos/software: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/";>http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/</a>>


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Date: 2 Nov 2007 12:20:12 -0500
From: "Rikki  Nitzkin" rikkinitzkin@...
Subject: RE: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer

I know of a lime and rice-hull floor mix...the call "clascalita" and they
use it in layers of 10-15 cm thick as an insulation layer of floor. It is
made of 1 part cement: 1 part Lime (either type): 8 parts rice hulls.

Has anyone ever used something similar? With what results?

Rikki Nitzkin
Aulas, Lleida, Espana
rikkinitzkin@...
(0034)657 33 51 62 
www.casasdepaja.com (Red de Construccion con Balas de Paja)
 

> -----Mensaje original-----
> De: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] En nombre de Paul Olivier
> Enviado el: lunes, 15 de octubre de 2007 3:58
> Para: 'GSBN'
> Asunto: RE: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer
> 
> Chris,
> 
> In the place of hemp, have you ever considered using chopped rice hulls.
> They also contain a lot of silica.
> 
> Thanks.
> Paul
> 
> Paul A. Olivier
> ESR International LLC
> 27c Pham Hong Thai, Ward 10
> Dalat City
> Lam Dong Province
> Vietnam
> 
> Louisiana telephone: 1-337-447-4124 (rings Vietnam)
> Texas telephone: 1-214-306-8746 (rings Vietnam)
> Mobile: 090-6458735 (in Vietnam)
> Mobile: 84-90-6458735 (outside Vietnam)
> New website: <a  target="_blank" href="http://esrint.com/";>http://esrint.com/</a>
> Old Website: <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.esrla.com/";>http://www.esrla.com/</a>
> Skype address: Xpolivier
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] On Behalf Of
> cmagwood@...
> Sent: Monday, October 15, 2007 7:52 AM
> To: GSBN
> Subject: Re: GSBN:Re: Lime plaster problems -Hemp the answer
> 
> I would concur that interesting and largely positive things happen when
> mixing lime with hemp! I make an oatmeally mixture of lime, gypsum and
> chopped hemp that makes an expanding (slightly) insulation for around
> windows and doors to replace the dreaded expanding foam that everybody is
> so fond of up here.
> 
> The same mix works very well for making cordwood walls... the resulting
> mix is strong enough to be the bearing matrix and insulative enough that
> one can dispense with having to make an inner and outer mortar layer with
> loose fill in between.
> 
> "Some chemistry" goes on between the lime and the high-silica hemp hurd
> that actually produces a mild bubbling/foaming action, making it the one
> mortar that swells slightly instead of shrinking.
> 
> This summer I hope to use this mix as an insulative base under an earthen
> floor. We'll see what happens!
> 
> Chris
> 
> >
> > The best source of information on lime  is to be found through
> >
> > <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/";>http://www.buildinglimesforum.org.uk/</a>
> >
> > There are now related organisations in the USA and Scandinavia.
> >
> > Worth subscribing to their journal. There is a fantastic article in
> > the latest issue Vol 14 by Becky Little and Tom Morton
> > called "Mixing it with Lime and Clay"
> >
> > Maybe Tom Morton would send you a copy of the article if you ask
> > Contact him through his excellent web site.  Download the info he has
> > on unfired earth buildings
> > <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.arc-architects.com/";>http://www.arc-architects.com/</a>
> >
> > Been reading the responses about cellulose
> >
> > Hemp is the answer , Hemp-lime plasters/renders solve all  problems.
> > Doesn't shrink or crack, copes admirably with  moisture, etc. etc
> >
> > Just finished writing a guide to hemp-lime construction ( well
> > almost) yesterday . Should be out in April 2008 published by BRE/IHS
> > Press.
> >
> > Hemp web sites
> > www.hemplime.org.uk
> > <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php";>http://www.limetechnology.co.uk/pages/hemcrete.php</a>
> >
> >
> > Tom Woolley
> >
> >
> > On 13 Oct 2007, at 00:44, MattsMyhrman@...:
> >
> >> In a message dated 10/10/2007 1:17:11 PM US Mountain Standard Time,
> >> andy@...:
> >>
> >>> Sometimes however lime plaster
> >>> was not used and rather a cow dung earth plaster was used followed by
> >>> regular coats of lime wash...though at the coast where we
> >>> experience strong
> >>> wind driven rains a lime coating was the norm.
> >>
> >> I believe that many of the cob buildings on the southern coast of
> >> England
> >> (Devon?) used several (maybe 4-5 initially) coats of lime wash.  It
> >> was
> >> considered somewhat sacrificial, and was followed up, after a year
> >> or two, with a
> >> couple more coats.  After that, another coat every couple of
> >> years.  Maybe Barbara
> >> Jones can check in on this  one, and also tell us whether lime wash
> >> over cob
> >> or earth plaster has traditionally been used anywhere in the
> >> British Isles
> >> where they experience driving rains coming in off the sea (up on
> >> the northwest
> >> coast of Scotland?).
> >>
> >>
> >> **************************************
> >>  
> >> 
> >>
> >>
> >> --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
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> >>   text/html
> >> ---
> >> ----
> >> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN
> >> list, send email to GSBN@...HELP in the
> >> SUBJECT line.
> >> ----
> >>
> >
> > Tom Woolley
> > woolley.tom@...
> > Rachel Bevan Architects
> > 17A Main Street
> > Saintfield
> > Ballynahinch
> > County Down
> > BT24 7AA
> > 028 97 512851
> >
> > also:
> > Graduate School of the Environment
> > Centre for Alternative Technology
> > Unit 7, Dyfi Eco Parc
> > Machynlleth
> > Powys, SY208AX
> >
> > 01654 703562
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --- StripMime Report -- processed MIME parts ---
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> > ----
> > For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list,
> > send email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
> > ----
> >
> >
> 
> ----
> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list,
> send
> email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
> ----
> 
> 




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Date: 2 Nov 2007 12:20:16 -0500
From: "Rikki  Nitzkin" rikkinitzkin@...
Subject: RE: GSBN:Moon phase harvesting of timbers

In spain, popular lore has it that the waning moon of January and February
are the best months to cut wood for use in construction. 

Many people still believe in and follow this custome. Maybe the climate is
to account for the difference in dates?



Rikki Nitzkin
Aulas, Lleida, Espana
rikkinitzkin@...
(0034)657 33 51 62 
www.casasdepaja.com (Red de Construccion con Balas de Paja)
 
> -----Mensaje original-----
> De: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] En nombre de Andy Horn
> Enviado el: domingo, 14 de octubre de 2007 22:14
> Para: GSBN
> Asunto: GSBN:Moon phase harvesting of timbers
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> I guess I may as well get another stimulating topic started now that Iim
> at
> it. Indeed I guess this and some of what follows from this should be
> included in one of the upcoming Last Straw editions???
> 
> 
> 
> As an environmentalist, I am horrified by the use of so many noxious and
> usually carcinogenic timber preservative treatments used in our
> construction
> industry. As such I have always made sure the timbers we use are treated
> as
> non-toxically as possible n which has meant getting or self treating using
> boron treatment (mammal friendly). Over the years Iive heard from various
> farmers and country builders that in times past their forefathers used to
> harvest their poplar beams and iSpanish reedi (thin bamboo species) for
> their houses around the autumn &amp; early winter new moon so as to prevent
> insect attack.
> 
> 
> 
> Then in Japan n where they have a similar practice of moon phase
> harvesting
> n I met a professor who had conducted a series of scientific experiments
> on
> how moon phase harvesting as well as aging with braches and bark will
> affect
> insect attack as well as checking/splitting and warping. Besides simple
> observation, she examined the sap content under a microscope and tested a
> whole variety of harvesting times. (I can send jpgis to anyone
> interested).
> 
> 
> 
> What she explained was that one needs to harvest between the times of the
> autumn equinox and winter solstice on the 3rd, 2nd, and last day
> proceeding
> the new moon i.e. in the waning phase of the moon only and not on the
> day/time of the new moon itself. Once felled, the timbers are left falling
> at a slope, with their cut ends propped up higher than the rest of the
> trunk. The timber is then initially cured in the forest with their bark,
> as
> well as the crown of the tree and a few side branches with leaves left
> intact. The timbers they were cutting (600mm diameter) was left for 3 - 4
> months. She explained that the idea is to ensure that the timber is
> virtually totally free of the sap, which is the food the insects are
> after.
> By propping the stem up and aging with a few branches and bark, the tree
> pulls the last traces of sap to its extremities as it dies.
> 
> 
> 
> A tree surgeon friend of mine has since concurred that during the autumn
> winter phase, trees go into a sort of hibernation and will typically slow
> their growth right down. When doing this - because they are less active
> and
> have less nutrient rich sap moving around - they pull various other resins
> and anti-bodies up from their root system to assist in fighting off the
> insect and fungal attack. Once mid winter is past, trees start to wake up
> again in preparation for spring and the sap will start to rise back into
> the
> tree.
> 
> 
> 
> Since my return I began experimenting with this myself. I was curious if
> this would still work here in the Cape, where we have winter rainfall. I
> was
> also curious to see what would happen with some of our local hardwood
> species like the invasive eucalyptus/gum species as the Japanese professor
> had be experimenting with their species of spuce and beach. The first time
> I
> experimented, I cut some gums (at the prescribed time) and did not bother
> to
> lift the trees up off the forest floor as the forest floor was steeply
> sloped so simply made sure they lay with their branches pointing down
> slope.
> I left the timber on the moist leave covered (though well drained) forest
> floor for 6 months. Upon my return I discovered that the timber had cured
> beautifully and besides a bit of brown staining on the bottom half, were
> in
> perfect condition. Not one single insect had touched the timber, no dry
> rot
> had occurred and no cracks or splitting was evident. I have continued with
> this practice ever since and am so confident about it that I do it many of
> with as many of my projects as possible.
> 
> 
> 
> I goggled moon phase harvesting and came across a reference to the
> Austrian
> wood cutters of times past having branded their timber according to which
> moon cycle their timbers were harvested. Apparently firewood is best cut
> at
> a full moon. Violin and cello makers followed certain bio-dynamic
> practises
> and used to accompany the wood cutters into the forests to ensure that
> their
> timbers where cut at certain precise times, which apparently also needed
> to
> coincide with certain planetary cycles. This apparently ensured the
> perfect
> resonance for their instruments.
> 
> 
> 
> I am curious about whether any of this is familiar to any of you out there
> and what kind of experience you have had with these methods or further
> insights that might be added.
> 
> 
> 
> Andy Horn
> 
> 
> 
> ECO DESIGN
> Architects &amp; Consultants
> A. R. HORN B.A.S. (UCT), B.Arch (UCT), Pr.Arch (SACAP),     MIA, CIA
> Telephone: 021 462 1614, Fax: 021 461 3198
> 
> Cel: 082 67 62110
> 4th Flr, The Armoury
> 160 Sir Lowry Rd
> CAPE TOWN
> 7925
> 
> web site: www.ecodesignarchitects.co.za
> 
> email: andy@...
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
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> 03:09 PM
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