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RE: GSBN:40% humidity



In my research into the effects of moisture on SB, I have been reading stuff by Tim Padfield, who while not being a SB expert, is certainly an expert on the passive control of internal humidity.
He does a lot of work for Museums with the same sort of demands for constant low RH.
His doctorate was entitled
'THE ROLE OF
ABSORBENT BUILDING MATERIALS
IN MODERATING CHANGES OF
RELATIVE HUMIDITY'

His web address is <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/";>http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/</a>

You also mention the need to keep straw under 20% - at a relative humidity of 40%, the straw would have a moisture content below 10% (not taking into account the external RH)

Jim

Jim Carfrae
PhD Research Student

Room 119, Reynolds Building
University of Plymouth
Drake Circus
Plymouth
PL4 8AA

jim.carfrae@...
07880 551922
01803 862369
________________________________________
From: GSBN [GSBN@...] On Behalf Of Andr&eacute; de Bouter [forum@lamaisonenpaille.com]
Sent: 06 November 2007 07:56
To: GSBN; ACHTE Christophe
Subject: GSBN:40%  humidity

Hello everyone,

Christophe Achte (that same army engineer student I mentioned earlier)
told me of a project of the French army were electronical material will
be stalled (for future use) in buildings that should keep the humidity
at a constant 40% to avoid corrosion of the material. He wondered if SB
with earthen plasters could be used instead of airtight 'modern'
materials. The need to keep the straw under 20% makes me hesitate to
give an answer. But someone who participated in the discussion told us
that 70% humidity in wine cellars is quite common.
Do we have any info, from the Ridge Winery for instance, that might shed
light on this subject?

Andr&eacute; -hic- de Bouter
France