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GSBN: Digest for 11/6/07



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---------------------------------------------------------------------


-> 40%  humidity
     by "Andre_de_Bouter" forum@...
-> RE: GSBN:40%  humidity
     by Jim Carfrae jim.carfrae@...
-> Re: GSBN:40%  humidity
     by "Jakub Wihan" kuba@...
-> RE: Moon phase harvesting of timbers
     by "Andy Horn" andy@...
-> Re: GSBN:40%  humidity
     by "Andre_de_Bouter" forum@...
-> Re: GSBN:40%  humidity (sorry, that previous mail was intended to go
directly to Kuba and not to the GSBN)
     by "Andre_de_Bouter" forum@...
-> Re: GSBN:RE: Moon phase harvesting of timbers
     by billc billc_lists@...
-> Re: 40% humidity
     by Derek Roff derek@...
-> Re: GSBN:40%  humidity
     by Graeme North ecodesign@...


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 6 Nov 2007 02:05:36 -0500
From: "Andre_de_Bouter" forum@...
Subject: 40%  humidity

Hello everyone,

Christophe Achte (that same army engineer student I mentioned earlier)
told me of a project of the French army were electronical material will
be stalled (for future use) in buildings that should keep the humidity
at a constant 40% to avoid corrosion of the material. He wondered if SB
with earthen plasters could be used instead of airtight 'modern'
materials. The need to keep the straw under 20% makes me hesitate to
give an answer. But someone who participated in the discussion told us
that 70% humidity in wine cellars is quite common.
Do we have any info, from the Ridge Winery for instance, that might shed
light on this subject?

Andr#233# -hic- de Bouter
France


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 6 Nov 2007 03:31:41 -0500
From: Jim Carfrae jim.carfrae@...
Subject: RE: GSBN:40%  humidity

In my research into the effects of moisture on SB, I have been reading stuff
by Tim Padfield, who while not being a SB expert, is certainly an expert on
the passive control of internal humidity.
He does a lot of work for Museums with the same sort of demands for constant
low RH.
His doctorate was entitled
'THE ROLE OF
ABSORBENT BUILDING MATERIALS
IN MODERATING CHANGES OF
RELATIVE HUMIDITY'

His web address is <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/";>http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/</a>

You also mention the need to keep straw under 20% - at a relative humidity of
40%, the straw would have a moisture content below 10% (not taking into
account the external RH)

Jim

Jim Carfrae
PhD Research Student

Room 119, Reynolds Building
University of Plymouth
Drake Circus
Plymouth
PL4 8AA

jim.carfrae@...
07880 551922
01803 862369
________________________________________
From: GSBN [GSBN@...] On Behalf Of Andre de Bouter
[forum@lamaisonenpaille.com]
Sent: 06 November 2007 07:56
To: GSBN; ACHTE Christophe
Subject: GSBN:40%  humidity

Hello everyone,

Christophe Achte (that same army engineer student I mentioned earlier)
told me of a project of the French army were electronical material will
be stalled (for future use) in buildings that should keep the humidity
at a constant 40% to avoid corrosion of the material. He wondered if SB
with earthen plasters could be used instead of airtight 'modern'
materials. The need to keep the straw under 20% makes me hesitate to
give an answer. But someone who participated in the discussion told us
that 70% humidity in wine cellars is quite common.
Do we have any info, from the Ridge Winery for instance, that might shed
light on this subject?

Andre -hic- de Bouter
France
- ----
For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list, send
email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
- ----



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 6 Nov 2007 04:16:36 -0500
From: "Jakub Wihan" kuba@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:40%  humidity

Hi Andre,

As Jim writes, worldwide expert on passive climate control in buildings such 
as archives and museums is Tim Padfield. His extensive research is available 
for free on his remarkable website.

You might be particularly interested in:

<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/musmic/musmicbuf.pdf";>http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/musmic/musmicbuf.pdf</a>

Materials creating all the surfaces (including equipment, furniture ,etc.) 
in the room seem to play crucial role in passive humidity (relative humdity) 
control as well as maintaining constant temperature. One might assume that 
straw bale building could be ideal for this purpose, because it won't need 
much energy for maintaining constant temperature in temperate climate of 
France and on top of it, according to Padfields research, earth plaster 
seems to create excellent surface for humidity buffering:

<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/wallbuff/wallbuff.php";>http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/wallbuff/wallbuff.php</a>

Plastered straw bale walls, according to Padfields e-mail, has enormous 
water vapour capacity:

<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.jakubwihan.com/pdf/thesis.pdf";>http://www.jakubwihan.com/pdf/thesis.pdf</a> , pg. 267

Personaly, I think that winery monitoring done by Straube and Schummacher 
won't help you much in this case, because the room designed for maintaining 
constant relative humidity of 80% was air conditioned. I would be very 
interested, if anyone out there did a monitoring that would more directly 
shed some light on the subject of using straw bale walls for passive 
maintainance of constant relative humidity. The monitoring that I'm familiar 
with (monitoring widely available for free on internet) suggests that 
palstered straw bales seem to make a very promising solution in case of 
various archives and museum buildings.



Love

Kuba



- ----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Andre de Bouter" forum@...
To: "GSBN" GSBN@...; "ACHTE Christophe" 
achte_christophe@...
Sent: Tuesday, November 06, 2007 7:56 AM
Subject: GSBN:40% humidity


> Hello everyone,
>
> Christophe Achte (that same army engineer student I mentioned earlier)
> told me of a project of the French army were electronical material will
> be stalled (for future use) in buildings that should keep the humidity
> at a constant 40% to avoid corrosion of the material. He wondered if SB
> with earthen plasters could be used instead of airtight 'modern'
> materials. The need to keep the straw under 20% makes me hesitate to
> give an answer. But someone who participated in the discussion told us
> that 70% humidity in wine cellars is quite common.
> Do we have any info, from the Ridge Winery for instance, that might shed
> light on this subject?
>
> Andre -hic- de Bouter
> France
> ----
> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list, 
> send email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT 
> ine.  ----
> 



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 6 Nov 2007 05:22:29 -0500
From: "Andy Horn" andy@...
Subject: RE: Moon phase harvesting of timbers

Hi Bill
Can you please send me your direct email address so I can mail you the jpg's
of the moon phase harvesting studies.
Kind regards
Andy

andy@...

- -----Original Message-----
From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] On Behalf Of billc
Sent: 14 October 2007 09:43 PM
To: GSBN
Subject: Re: GSBN:Moon phase harvesting of timbers

At 8:14 PM +0000 10/14/07, Andy Horn wrote:
>I am curious about whether any of this is familiar to any of you out there
>and what kind of experience you have had with these methods or further
>insights that might be added.

Facinating stuff about the moon phase research.  It's nice to hear
that there's scientific corroboration.   It doesn't surprise me -
farmers have been planting and harvesting by the moon for ages (the
smart ones, anyway), and I've long been aware that the fall is the
best harvest time for trees due to their moving into a dormant phase
(and often wondered if that isn't one of many contributors to the low
quality of store-bought wood).   Similar is true for fruit tree &amp;
vine pruning, which is something I dabble in.

I'd be interested in the jpgs.


- --
Bill Christensen
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://sustainablesources.com/contact/";>http://sustainablesources.com/contact/</a>>

Don't miss October's Natural Building Colloquium:
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://naturalbuildingtexas.org";>http://naturalbuildingtexas.org</a>>

Green Building Professionals Directory: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://directory.sustainablesources.com";>http://directory.sustainablesources.com</a>>
Sustainable Building Calendar: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/";>http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/</a>>
Green Real Estate: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/";>http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/</a>>
Straw Bale Registry: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/";>http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/</a>>
Books/videos/software: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/";>http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/</a>>
- ----
For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list, send
email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
- ----


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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 6 Nov 2007 05:51:19 -0500
From: "Andre_de_Bouter" forum@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:40%  humidity

Bonjour Kuba,

Thanks for your participation. Can you tell me again where I can
download your reserach on moisture so I can try to read it while in the
car to the south of spain in a few days.

All the best,
Andr#233#

PS Barbara's conference was very appr#233#ciated (we went on until 02h30!!!)
and I think more loadbearing SB will be happening in France.




Jakub Wihan a #233#crit :
> Hi Andre,
>
> As Jim writes, worldwide expert on passive climate control in
> buildings such as archives and museums is Tim Padfield. His extensive
> research is available for free on his remarkable website.
>
> You might be particularly interested in:
>
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/musmic/musmicbuf.pdf";>http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/musmic/musmicbuf.pdf</a>
>
> Materials creating all the surfaces (including equipment, furniture
> ,etc.) in the room seem to play crucial role in passive humidity
> (relative humdity) control as well as maintaining constant
> temperature. One might assume that straw bale building could be ideal
> for this purpose, because it won't need much energy for maintaining
> constant temperature in temperate climate of France and on top of it,
> according to Padfields research, earth plaster seems to create
> excellent surface for humidity buffering:
>
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/wallbuff/wallbuff.php";>http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/wallbuff/wallbuff.php</a>
>
> Plastered straw bale walls, according to Padfields e-mail, has
> enormous water vapour capacity:
>
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.jakubwihan.com/pdf/thesis.pdf";>http://www.jakubwihan.com/pdf/thesis.pdf</a> , pg. 267
>
> Personaly, I think that winery monitoring done by Straube and
> Schummacher won't help you much in this case, because the room
> designed for maintaining constant relative humidity of 80% was air
> conditioned. I would be very interested, if anyone out there did a
> monitoring that would more directly shed some light on the subject of
> using straw bale walls for passive maintainance of constant relative
> humidity. The monitoring that I'm familiar with (monitoring widely
> available for free on internet) suggests that palstered straw bales
> seem to make a very promising solution in case of various archives and
> museum buildings.
>
>
>
> Love
>
> Kuba
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andr#233# de Bouter"
> forum@...
> To: "GSBN" GSBN@...; "ACHTE Christophe"
> achte_christophe@...
> Sent: Tuesday, November 06, 2007 7:56 AM
> Subject: GSBN:40% humidity
>
>
>> Hello everyone,
>>
>> Christophe Achte (that same army engineer student I mentioned earlier)
>> told me of a project of the French army were electronical material will
>> be stalled (for future use) in buildings that should keep the humidity
>> at a constant 40% to avoid corrosion of the material. He wondered if SB
>> with earthen plasters could be used instead of airtight 'modern'
>> materials. The need to keep the straw under 20% makes me hesitate to
>> give an answer. But someone who participated in the discussion told us
>> that 70% humidity in wine cellars is quite common.
>> Do we have any info, from the Ridge Winery for instance, that might shed
>> light on this subject?
>>
>> Andr#233# -hic- de Bouter
>> France
>> ----
>> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN
>> list, send email to GSBN@...HELP in the
>> SUBJECT ine.  ----
>>
>
> ----
> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN
> list, send email to GSBN@...HELP in the
> SUBJECT line.  ----
>
>
>


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 6 Nov 2007 06:05:16 -0500
From: "Andre_de_Bouter" forum@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:40%  humidity (sorry, that previous mail was intended to go
directly to Kuba and not to the GSBN)

Sorry, that previous mail was intended to go directly to Kuba and not to
the GSBN
Andr#233# - faster than his brain- de Bouter


Andr#233# de Bouter a #233#crit :
> Bonjour Kuba,
>
> Thanks for your participation. Can you tell me again where I can
> download your reserach on moisture so I can try to read it while in the
> car to the south of spain in a few days.
>
> All the best,
> Andr#233#
>
> PS Barbara's conference was very appr#233#ciated (we went on until 02h30!!!)
> and I think more loadbearing SB will be happening in France.
>
>
>
>
> Jakub Wihan a #233#crit :
>> Hi Andre,
>>
>> As Jim writes, worldwide expert on passive climate control in
>> buildings such as archives and museums is Tim Padfield. His extensive
>> research is available for free on his remarkable website.
>>
>> You might be particularly interested in:
>>
>> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/musmic/musmicbuf.pdf";>http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/musmic/musmicbuf.pdf</a>
>>
>> Materials creating all the surfaces (including equipment, furniture
>> ,etc.) in the room seem to play crucial role in passive humidity
>> (relative humdity) control as well as maintaining constant
>> temperature. One might assume that straw bale building could be ideal
>> for this purpose, because it won't need much energy for maintaining
>> constant temperature in temperate climate of France and on top of it,
>> according to Padfields research, earth plaster seems to create
>> excellent surface for humidity buffering:
>>
>> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/wallbuff/wallbuff.php";>http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/wallbuff/wallbuff.php</a>
>>
>> Plastered straw bale walls, according to Padfields e-mail, has
>> enormous water vapour capacity:
>>
>> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.jakubwihan.com/pdf/thesis.pdf";>http://www.jakubwihan.com/pdf/thesis.pdf</a> , pg. 267
>>
>> Personaly, I think that winery monitoring done by Straube and
>> Schummacher won't help you much in this case, because the room
>> designed for maintaining constant relative humidity of 80% was air
>> conditioned. I would be very interested, if anyone out there did a
>> monitoring that would more directly shed some light on the subject of
>> using straw bale walls for passive maintainance of constant relative
>> humidity. The monitoring that I'm familiar with (monitoring widely
>> available for free on internet) suggests that palstered straw bales
>> seem to make a very promising solution in case of various archives and
>> museum buildings.
>>
>>
>>
>> Love
>>
>> Kuba
>>
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andr#233# de Bouter"
>> forum@...
>> To: "GSBN" GSBN@...; "ACHTE Christophe"
>> achte_christophe@...
>> Sent: Tuesday, November 06, 2007 7:56 AM
>> Subject: GSBN:40% humidity
>>
>>
>>> Hello everyone,
>>>
>>> Christophe Achte (that same army engineer student I mentioned earlier)
>>> told me of a project of the French army were electronical material will
>>> be stalled (for future use) in buildings that should keep the humidity
>>> at a constant 40% to avoid corrosion of the material. He wondered if SB
>>> with earthen plasters could be used instead of airtight 'modern'
>>> materials. The need to keep the straw under 20% makes me hesitate to
>>> give an answer. But someone who participated in the discussion told us
>>> that 70% humidity in wine cellars is quite common.
>>> Do we have any info, from the Ridge Winery for instance, that might
>>> shed
>>> light on this subject?
>>>
>>> Andr#233# -hic- de Bouter
>>> France
>>> ----
>>> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN
>>> list, send email to GSBN@...HELP in the
>>> SUBJECT ine.  ----
>>>
>>
>> ----
>> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN
>> list, send email to GSBN@...HELP in the
>> SUBJECT line.  ----
>>
>>
>>
> ----
> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN
> list, send email to GSBN@...HELP in the
> SUBJECT line.  ----
>
>
>


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 6 Nov 2007 09:34:41 -0500
From: billc billc_lists@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:RE: Moon phase harvesting of timbers

Sure,

The safest address to use is this one - billc_lists@...

Thanks!

At 1:04 PM +0000 11/6/07, Andy Horn wrote:
>Hi Bill
>Can you please send me your direct email address so I can mail you the jpg's
>of the moon phase harvesting studies.
>Kind regards
>Andy
>
>andy@...
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: GSBN [<a  target="_blank" href="mailto:GSBN@...";>mailto:GSBN@...] On Behalf Of billc
>Sent: 14 October 2007 09:43 PM
>To: GSBN
>Subject: Re: GSBN:Moon phase harvesting of timbers
>
>At 8:14 PM +0000 10/14/07, Andy Horn wrote:
>>I am curious about whether any of this is familiar to any of you out there
>>and what kind of experience you have had with these methods or further
>>insights that might be added.
>
>Facinating stuff about the moon phase research.  It's nice to hear
>that there's scientific corroboration.   It doesn't surprise me -
>farmers have been planting and harvesting by the moon for ages (the
>smart ones, anyway), and I've long been aware that the fall is the
>best harvest time for trees due to their moving into a dormant phase
>(and often wondered if that isn't one of many contributors to the low
>quality of store-bought wood).   Similar is true for fruit tree &amp;
>vine pruning, which is something I dabble in.
>
>I'd be interested in the jpgs.
>
>
>--
>Bill Christensen
><<a  target="_blank" href="http://sustainablesources.com/contact/";>http://sustainablesources.com/contact/</a>>
>
>Don't miss October's Natural Building Colloquium:
><<a  target="_blank" href="http://naturalbuildingtexas.org";>http://naturalbuildingtexas.org</a>>
>
>Green Building Professionals Directory: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://directory.sustainablesources.com";>http://directory.sustainablesources.com</a>>
>Sustainable Building Calendar: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/";>http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/</a>>
>Green Real Estate: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/";>http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/</a>>
>Straw Bale Registry: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/";>http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/</a>>
>Books/videos/software: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/";>http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/</a>>
>----
>For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN list, send
>email to GSBN@...HELP in the SUBJECT line.
>----
>
>
>No virus found in this incoming message.
>Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>Version: 7.5.488 / Virus Database: 269.14.8/1064 - Release Date: 2007/10/11
>03:09 PM
>
>
>No virus found in this outgoing message.
>Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>Version: 7.5.503 / Virus Database: 269.15.18/1104 - Release Date: 2007/11/01
>06:47 PM
>
>
>----
>For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN
>list, send email to GSBN@...HELP in the
>SUBJECT line.
>----


- --
Bill Christensen
<<a  target="_blank" href="http://sustainablesources.com/contact/";>http://sustainablesources.com/contact/</a>>

Green Building Professionals Directory: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://directory.sustainablesources.com";>http://directory.sustainablesources.com</a>>
Sustainable Building Calendar: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/";>http://SustainableSources.com/calendar/</a>>
Green Real Estate: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/";>http://SustainableSources.com/realestate/</a>>
Straw Bale Registry: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/";>http://sbregistry.sustainablesources.com/</a>>
Books/videos/software: <<a  target="_blank" href="http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/";>http://bookstore.sustainablesources.com/</a>>


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 6 Nov 2007 11:21:17 -0500
From: Derek Roff derek@...
Subject: Re: 40% humidity

It's easy for our clients to be confused by humidity numbers, so I 
think it bears repeating:

Humidity of the air and moisture content of the straw are not the same, 
and will have vastly different values in most building situations.

The 40% relative humidity (RH) of the air in a building, which Andre 
mentions, is a good value for comfortable human respiration.  As Jim 
says, if there are no other sources of moisture, this RH in the air 
would result in a moisture content (MC) of the straw below 10%.

For a client who has read that straw moisture must stay below 20%, an 
RH of 40% looks scary.  How can we best explain the distinction between 
relative humidity of the air and moisture content of the straw?  The 
relationship between RH and MC varies with temperature and atmospheric 
pressure, resulting in a complex psychrometric chart filled with 
various intersecting curves.  These charts would be baffling to the 
average person.

Perhaps John Straube or Don Fugler can comment on how to effectively 
convey the essential concepts to a confused client.  In my climate, I 
can assure people that at normal household temperatures, an interior RH 
under 70% will present no risk to the straw.  Leaks, cracks and rain 
striking the plaster can still cause moisture risks, of course.

This online moisture content calculator might help in some cases.  It's 
designed for wood, but I think the numbers for straw are almost 
identical.  I hope Don and John will correct me if I am wrong about 
that similarity.

<<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.woodbin.com/ref/wood/emc.htm";>http://www.woodbin.com/ref/wood/emc.htm</a>>

Derelict

Derek Roff
Language Learning Center
Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
Internet: derek@...


- --On Tuesday, November 6, 2007 9:58 AM +0000 Jakub Wihan 
kuba@... wrote:

> Hi Andre,
>
> As Jim writes, worldwide expert on passive climate control in
> buildings such as archives and museums is Tim Padfield. His extensive
> research is available for free on his remarkable website.
>
> You might be particularly interested in:
>
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/musmic/musmicbuf.pdf";>http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/musmic/musmicbuf.pdf</a>
>
> Materials creating all the surfaces (including equipment, furniture
> ,etc.) in the room seem to play crucial role in passive humidity
> (relative humdity) control as well as maintaining constant
> temperature. One might assume that straw bale building could be ideal
> for this purpose, because it won't need much energy for maintaining
> constant temperature in temperate climate of France and on top of it,
> according to Padfields research, earth plaster seems to create
> excellent surface for humidity buffering:
>
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/wallbuff/wallbuff.php";>http://www.padfield.org/tim/cfys/wallbuff/wallbuff.php</a>
>
> Plastered straw bale walls, according to Padfields e-mail, has
> enormous water vapour capacity:
>
> <a  target="_blank" href="http://www.jakubwihan.com/pdf/thesis.pdf";>http://www.jakubwihan.com/pdf/thesis.pdf</a> , pg. 267
>
> Personaly, I think that winery monitoring done by Straube and
> Schummacher won't help you much in this case, because the room
> designed for maintaining constant relative humidity of 80% was air
> conditioned. I would be very interested, if anyone out there did a
> monitoring that would more directly shed some light on the subject of
> using straw bale walls for passive maintainance of constant relative
> humidity. The monitoring that I'm familiar with (monitoring widely
> available for free on internet) suggests that palstered straw bales
> seem to make a very promising solution in case of various archives
> and museum buildings.
>
>
>
> Love
>
> Kuba
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andre de Bouter"
> forum@...
> To: "GSBN" GSBN@...; "ACHTE Christophe"
> achte_christophe@...
> Sent: Tuesday, November 06, 2007 7:56 AM
> Subject: GSBN:40% humidity
>
>
>> Hello everyone,
>>
>> Christophe Achte (that same army engineer student I mentioned
>> earlier) told me of a project of the French army were electronical
>> material will be stalled (for future use) in buildings that should
>> keep the humidity at a constant 40% to avoid corrosion of the
>> material. He wondered if SB with earthen plasters could be used
>> instead of airtight 'modern' materials. The need to keep the straw
>> under 20% makes me hesitate to give an answer. But someone who
>> participated in the discussion told us that 70% humidity in wine
>> cellars is quite common.
>> Do we have any info, from the Ridge Winery for instance, that might
>> shed light on this subject?
>>
>> Andre -hic- de Bouter
>> France
>> ----
>> For instructions on joining, leaving, or otherwise using the GSBN
>> list,  send email to GSBN@...HELP in the
>> SUBJECT  ine.  ----
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Derek Roff
Language Learning Center
Ortega Hall 129, MSC03-2100
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
505/277-7368, fax 505/277-3885
Internet: derek@...



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Date: 6 Nov 2007 21:31:55 -0500
From: Graeme North ecodesign@...
Subject: Re: GSBN:40%  humidity


The following link may be of interest

<a  target="_blank" href="http://www.natmus.dk/cons/tp/wallbuff/wallbuff.htm";>http://www.natmus.dk/cons/tp/wallbuff/wallbuff.htm</a>

Graeme


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